Film genre – Mondovino Le Film http://mondovino-lefilm.com/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 16:32:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/lefilm-150x150.png Film genre – Mondovino Le Film http://mondovino-lefilm.com/ 32 32 Andor offers a rich new approach to telling a Star Wars story | TV/Streaming https://mondovino-lefilm.com/andor-offers-a-rich-new-approach-to-telling-a-star-wars-story-tv-streaming/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 16:03:34 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/andor-offers-a-rich-new-approach-to-telling-a-star-wars-story-tv-streaming/ The first season of “Andor” is set five years before the action of “Rogue One,” and its twelve first-season episodes would take place over roughly a year for its titular character, with the second and final season filling in the other four. years. Diego Luna returns as Cassian Andor in a show that seems structured […]]]>

The first season of “Andor” is set five years before the action of “Rogue One,” and its twelve first-season episodes would take place over roughly a year for its titular character, with the second and final season filling in the other four. years. Diego Luna returns as Cassian Andor in a show that seems structured to reveal how he became an important figure in the Rebel Alliance. How does an ordinary guy become a central part of a revolution? The prequels often just repeat known details, filling in the gaps with Easter eggs instead of the character, but creator Tony Gilroy (the “Michael Clayton” scribe who co-wrote “Rogue One” returns to write the series ) is more interested in a nuanced birth story for a revolutionary. History often only records major events, but how those involved got there can be just as fascinating.

Don’t get me wrong, this show’s Andor is already on the verge of saving the universe, having fought with the rebellion for years, but the premiere’s tone is more of a noir than a sci-fi action epic. -fiction. This Andor is more of a wanderer than a leader, someone whose life has been dismantled by the Empire but has yet to be radicalized to fight back. The opening episodes center on a classic MacGuffin, a box stolen from the Empire and sold by Andor but not really as important as what it means and what its possession does to the characters around them. It’s an item Andor tries to pawn to secure transport that catches the Empire’s eye, bringing it deeper into a conflict that will include new characters played by Stellan Skarsgård, Adria Arjona, Denise Gough , Kyle Soller and Fiona Shaw, as well as familiar films like Forest Whitaker’s Saw Gerrera and Genevieve O’Reilly’s Mon Mothma. Alex Lawther (“The End of the F**king World”) and Ebon-Moss Bachrach (“The Bear”) appear in the fourth episode as Andor becomes more rooted in a construction revolution and the series s open even more. Tony Gilroy hands writing duties to his brother Dan Gilroy (“Nightcrawler”) for episodes four through six and Toby Haynes (“Black Mirror: USS Callister”) directs the first three episodes before handing the lightsaber over to Susanna White (“Parade’s End”).

That’s quite the cast and crew pedigree for any show, and the dedication to craft of the crew assembled to bring “Andor” to life pays off. Luna is particularly good, never overplaying the pretentious possibilities of a future hero. He clearly sees this as a character study that takes place in space instead of part of a growing canon, and this realism grounds the whole piece. It’s also a show with surprisingly strong visual compositions, considering things like lighting, placement of characters in the setting, and production design in ways that genre television often ignores. Even the score is richer and more distinct than many Disney+ shows, and the editing is tighter.

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Review of “All the beauty and bloodshed”: personnel policy https://mondovino-lefilm.com/review-of-all-the-beauty-and-bloodshed-personnel-policy/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 14:51:02 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/review-of-all-the-beauty-and-bloodshed-personnel-policy/ For director Laura Poitras, All the beauty and bloodshed represents a kind of departure. Having centered films on people ranging from a former bodyguard of Osama bin Laden to The oath to Edward Snowden in Citizenfour and Julian Assange in Risk, his latest documentary is about an artist: the legendary photographer Nan Goldin. But there […]]]>

For director Laura Poitras, All the beauty and bloodshed represents a kind of departure. Having centered films on people ranging from a former bodyguard of Osama bin Laden to The oath to Edward Snowden in Citizenfour and Julian Assange in Risk, his latest documentary is about an artist: the legendary photographer Nan Goldin. But there is still a strong political dimension to the film, as Goldin was a major force in bringing down the Sackler family, owners of Purdue Pharma, one of the global pharmaceutical companies largely responsible for the opioid epidemic. in the USA.

It’s a deeply personal mission for Goldin, as someone who found herself addicted to OxyContin for a time until she nearly died of an overdose. Goldin’s activism, however, is, according to the film, born not just from his contact with the opioid crisis, but from a life of dealing with mental illness, addiction and premature death to varying degrees. various. All the beauty and bloodshed turns out to be a film as bifurcated as its title: it’s half a biographical portrait of Goldin told in his own words, half a chronicle of his current activism by highlighting the Sacklers’ ruthless pressure on these addictive drugs. unsuspecting public.

Poitras divided the film into seven chapters, each devoting approximately half of each section to a period in Goldin’s life, with the other half returning to contemporary times to depict an episode in his campaign against the Sacklers. The back-and-forth structure makes the film somewhat unwieldy, like two different movies coexisting uncomfortably into one. Poitras doesn’t quite convince us that every biographical detail Goldin offers us about his life necessarily relates to his direct actions against the Sacklers and his advocacy for harm reduction.

And yet, relevant or not, the details themselves are compelling, especially as Goldin tells it to us in a slideshow format reminiscent of his own public presentations of The Ballad of Sex Addiction and other seminal photo series of hers. Goldin covers everything from her own hellish suburban upbringing, to discovering both a welcoming queer community in Provincetown and her own bisexuality, to her personal and professional struggles while living in downtown New York, the ravages of the AIDS crisis which she witnessed in the 1980s.

The warmth, sadness and occasional anger with which Goldin recounts these experiences is poignant in itself. Moreover, hearing Goldin speak openly not just about his past, but also how his experiences have affected his candid, intimate, and vulnerable artistry provides an illuminating window into his photographic artistry, of which the film offers a generous on-screen sample. . As a portrait, All the beauty and bloodshed accomplishes the goal of any documentary worthy of its genre by shedding insightful light on what informs an artist’s vision.

It was during scenes in the film detailing the injustices of the Sacklers and Goldin’s crusade against them—from public protests at arts organizations still bearing Sackler’s name to the formation of his organization PAIN (Prescription Addiction Intervention Now)—that the film most resembles that of Poitras. previous work. His first-hand access to the staging of, say, his band’s 2018 protest at the Metropolitan Museum of Art at what was previously known as the Sackler Wing exudes the life-or-death immediacy that The oath and Citizenfour had in spades. The same goes for a shorter passage in which various members of PAIN, as well as New York journalist Patrick Radden Keefe, find themselves stalked by a mysterious figure who they believe has been sent by Purdue Pharma to spy on them ( a claim that Purdue has strongly denied, of course).

But All the beauty and bloodshed shows the fearless Poitras stepping into new emotional terrain. The film’s title comes from a report a doctor filed on Goldin’s sister, Barbara, who committed suicide at the age of 18 after many years in and out of mental hospitals. To some extent, it speaks to the broad and inclusive way the rebellious Barbara saw the world, a perspective that was mistakenly considered a mental illness during the more repressive 1960s, and which Goldin spent her whole life trying. to honor. Based on this loving and powerful cinematic portrayal, it’s a perspective Poitras feels close to, making this film arguably the closest to a personal manifesto she’s offered in her filmography to date.

Score:

Director: Laura Poitras Distributer: Neon Runtime: 113 minutes Evaluation: NR Year: 2022

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Do Revenge review: Camila Mendes did a mean version of Mean Girls https://mondovino-lefilm.com/do-revenge-review-camila-mendes-did-a-mean-version-of-mean-girls/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 07:07:00 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/do-revenge-review-camila-mendes-did-a-mean-version-of-mean-girls/ Alfred Hitchcock’s influence is evident in Netflix’s dark teen comedy Revenge. He was inspired by his 1951 thriller Strangers on a trainitself based on a novel by The Talented Mr. Ripley writer Patricia Highsmith. But instead of focusing on a meandering murder scheme, Revenge centers on a plot to kill the status of two members […]]]>

Alfred Hitchcock’s influence is evident in Netflix’s dark teen comedy Revenge. He was inspired by his 1951 thriller Strangers on a trainitself based on a novel by The Talented Mr. Ripley writer Patricia Highsmith. But instead of focusing on a meandering murder scheme, Revenge centers on a plot to kill the status of two members of the It Crowd.

The film fits right into the dark comedy canon about teenage cruelty – think Heathers Where mean girls. Director Jennifer Kaytin Robinson (co-writer of Thor: Love and Thundercreator of Sweet/Vicious) weaves a neat 2022 update of the genre. A few romantic subplots slow down the middle of the film, but by the end the film regains its momentum and comes together for a satisfying ending.

[Ed. note: This review contains setup spoilers for Do Revenge.]

Photo: Kim Simms/Netflix

Revenge follows Drea (Camila Mendes), formerly the most popular girl in school, until her reputation plummets — not just because her ex-boyfriend Max released her sex tape, but also because she punched him in the face afterwards. Drea attends her exclusive prep school in Miami on a scholarship, while her ex (Austin Abrams) comes from a wealthy family. He has more social capital than her, so he is able to turn her friends and the rest of the school against her, claiming that a video of her phone was leaked and she assaulted him for no reason. Drea just wants to grit her teeth and finish her senior year, but that changes when she meets transfer student Eleanor (Maya Hawke).

Years ago, Eleanor became a social outcast when her crush Carissa (Ava Capri) spread a rumor that Eleanor held her down and forcibly kissed her. After landing in the same school as Carissa, Eleanor dreads seeing her again. After an emotional moment in the bathroom, Eleanor and Drea befriend the people who wronged them and hatch a plan for revenge, but with one important caveat. The two decide to switch targets for revenge: Drea will take out Carissa, while Eleanor will infiltrate Max’s group of friends for the ultimate revenge.

Like other movies in the mean high school girl subgenre, Revenge focuses on convoluted social conspiracies and vicious grassroots cliques. But it’s not a derivative or a cliché: instead, it’s a natural evolution of this type of film for 2022. Parts of high school are constant, but youth culture is changing rapidly, so films for teenagers – especially those that adapt or pay homage to older films. hardware — may feel outdated. Revenge dodges that curse because of how cleverly Robinson and co-writer Celeste Ballard update certain plot points.

a skinny blond boy in front of a banner that says straight cis men advocating for the female-identifying student league.  behind him, three men applaud

Photo: Kim Simms/Netflix

On the one hand, Max is a villain for 2022 — a handsome, straight, rich white boy who uses performative public awakening to hide his true motives. And as a privileged young man, Max is basically untouchable. But that just means Drea and Eleanor have to come up with an even more pleasantly complex plan to bring him down – and initially, it makes them easier to root for.

But as their actions escalate, their obsessions grow. Hawke and Mendes do a fantastic job of never giving the audience a clear person to root for. At first, their friendship seems inspired, as they unite against those who have wronged them. But then it becomes one-sided and toxic. And then it mutates into something else entirely.

It’s one hell of a ride, all done with influencer-worthy soft pastels. Part of the reason movies like Heathers and mean girls became so iconic due to their strong visual palettes, which played with the conventions of idealized adolescence in their respective eras. Revenge continues the trend, updating the look of the film for those intimately familiar with a perfectly calibrated aesthetic that fits perfectly under social media hashtags, be it “Instagram witch” or #glamgirl.

four girls in pastel colored school uniforms sit around a fountain

Photo: Kim Simms/Netflix

When the film focuses on revenge plots or Eleanor and Drea’s increasingly toxic relationship, it’s crisp and tight. But halfway through, a few romantic B-plots start to take center stage. Drea gets involved with Carissa’s friend, rebellious artist Russ (Rish Shah), while Eleanor flirts with Max’s sister, Gabbi (Talia Ryder). While some of these scenes are sweet, none of these relationships do much to make Eleanor or Drea any more likeable or despicable. They seem to exist in the sense that teen movies need mandatory romances, and nothing more. They end up dragging the film and slowing it down.

In the end, however, the film returns to Eleanor and Drea – and for the better. A series of twists bring them together and they play each other in deliciously unnerving ways. At points, the film seems to turn into a judgmental statement about the dangers of revenge, especially when Drea’s college plans are in jeopardy. But Robinson and Ballard smartly avoid those pitfalls, proving they understand what audiences really want from these kinds of movies: the indirect thrill of watching vicious teenage girls go to great lengths to get what they want, while navigating the complicated relationships they form with one another. Without spoiling themselves too much, Eleanor and Drea get both what they want and what they deserve. It’s a satisfying conclusion that neither punishes nor exalts them. Just ignore the cheesy epilogues where they court their future love interests.

Revenge debuts on Netflix on September 16.

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Blood Moon Pictures taps ‘Scary Movie’ actor for new movie | Features https://mondovino-lefilm.com/blood-moon-pictures-taps-scary-movie-actor-for-new-movie-features/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/blood-moon-pictures-taps-scary-movie-actor-for-new-movie-features/ Blood Moon Pictures, a local independent film company headed by filmmakers PJ Starks and Eric Huskisson, is tapping some big names for its upcoming film “New Fears Eve.” Felissa Rose, who played Angela Baker in the 1983 cult horror film ‘Sleepaway Camp’, Hannah Fierman, known as Lily in the 2012 horror anthology ‘V/H/S’ and the […]]]>

Blood Moon Pictures, a local independent film company headed by filmmakers PJ Starks and Eric Huskisson, is tapping some big names for its upcoming film “New Fears Eve.”

Felissa Rose, who played Angela Baker in the 1983 cult horror film ‘Sleepaway Camp’, Hannah Fierman, known as Lily in the 2012 horror anthology ‘V/H/S’ and the movie horror spoof “SiREN” from 2016 and Dave Sheridan, who rose to prominence as Officer Doofy in the horror parody “Scary Movie” from 2000, were cast in starring roles.

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Werewolf By Night Poster Teases Gael García Bernal’s Dark Side https://mondovino-lefilm.com/werewolf-by-night-poster-teases-gael-garcia-bernals-dark-side/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 22:43:00 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/werewolf-by-night-poster-teases-gael-garcia-bernals-dark-side/ While Marvel’s D23 reveals weren’t as extensive as many fans had hoped, one of the highlights of their showcase was the first trailer for the upcoming Marvel Halloween special. night werewolf featuring Gael Garcia Bernal. The trailer was a thrilling love letter to classic monster movies and the horror genre in general. However, a new […]]]>

While Marvel’s D23 reveals weren’t as extensive as many fans had hoped, one of the highlights of their showcase was the first trailer for the upcoming Marvel Halloween special. night werewolf featuring Gael Garcia Bernal. The trailer was a thrilling love letter to classic monster movies and the horror genre in general. However, a new poster has also been released alongside the trailer, which further pushes the special’s genre influences right into Dracula’s castle.


The haunting new poster sees Bernal’s Jack Russell with an unsettling expression of fear on his face as he tries to keep his inner monster at bay. However, behind Jack is his werewolf counterpart who takes the form of his shadow. This is a classic thematic genre trope that beautifully encapsulates the special’s sinister hook. While the brilliantly stylized trailer was very inspired by the Hammer horror era of the 50s and 60s, the poster is more in keeping with something you would see in a Classic Universal Monster movie from the 40s. Particularly 1941 The werewolf. The way this poster is lit with heavy shadows and a gray background is very gothic in nature. The trailer only gave us teases about Jack’s darker half, but at least from the way the monster is portrayed in this image, the MCU’s werewolf seems to be drawing inspiration from the way whose Lon Chaney Jr. appeared in Universal’s classic masterpiece.

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Plus, the way Jack is framed in the poster looks like a reference to another horror gem. Jack is positioned as if he is descending some sort of ramp, which makes this shot mirror the infamous scene where Count Orlok slowly climbs a flight of stairs in 1922. Nosferatus. Like this poster, we could only see the creepy shadow of this iconic vampire.

RELATED: Marc Spector Confronts the Werewolf of Night in This Year’s ‘Moon Knight Annual’

Marvel dipped its toes in horror water with Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness earlier this year, but night werewolf seems to gleefully dive headfirst into the genre’s dark gothic history. Marvel’s Werewolf is a character known to be an enemy of Moon Knight, and the night werewolf The series allowed Marvel Comics to tell full-fledged horror stories they couldn’t in their more traditional superhero books. This special seems to take a page from its source material as the trailer was filled with great atmospheric tension. It helps that it’s black and white, which only added to the nostalgic vibe he was going for. Nevertheless, it seems to be an anxious thriller in the same vein as the Chateau Guillaume classic The house on the haunted hill – the only difference being the literal monsters lurking in the night. In other words, this Halloween special is a horror fan’s bloodthirsty dream.

night werewolf will premiere on Disney+ on October 7, just in time for Halloween. Along with Bernal, the series also features Laura Donnelly who would have played the Night Vampire and the special is directed by Oscar-winning composers Michael Giacchino and Jaycob Maya. While we wait for Marvel’s next adventure in horror, you can see night werewolfThe new Gothic poster below.

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An impressive cast in a derivative thriller https://mondovino-lefilm.com/an-impressive-cast-in-a-derivative-thriller/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 15:03:00 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/an-impressive-cast-in-a-derivative-thriller/ The murder mystery genre is one of the most popular types of entertainment. TV series, whether it’s a long-running procedural or limited series, films of all types of budgets and, of course, the mystery novel – people just can’t get enough of a good old thriller. We have been inundated with murder mystery films of […]]]>

The murder mystery genre is one of the most popular types of entertainment. TV series, whether it’s a long-running procedural or limited series, films of all types of budgets and, of course, the mystery novel – people just can’t get enough of a good old thriller. We have been inundated with murder mystery films of varying quality. Rian Johnsonit is Knives out took the world by storm, so much so that a sequel is coming later this year. Such a busy genre can make some entries tedious and repetitive – every plot point meant to be surprised feeling like something we’ve seen many times before. Tom-Georges‘s murder mystery-comedy, See how they work, is an ode to traditional murder mystery – classy English accents, an array of distasteful characters, and a detective wearing a felt hat and woolen coat. And, of course, the queen of mystery herself – Agatha Christie.

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Yes, the film has all the touchstones of a classic mystery, feeling both like a love letter to a Christie-esque tale and trying to be one itself.

The story takes place in London in 1953. A staging of Christie’s play, mousetrap, what stars Richard Attenborough and his wife, Sheila Sim, celebrates its 100th show. The cast is joined at the party by the trio of men who have been tasked with adapting the play into a film: John Woolf (Reece Mower), the famous producer behind The African QueenMervyn Cocker Norris (David Oyelowo, gloriously flamboyant way), the pompous playwright brought in to adapt the screenplay, and Leo Köpernick (Adrian Brody), the arrogant American alcoholic who is supposed to direct the film. Just when it is established that Köpernick is hated by nearly every other character, he is violently murdered in one of the theater’s dressing rooms. Join our detective duo: the tired and drunk Inspector Stoddard (Sam Rockwell) and Constable Stalker, a serious but somewhat stupid recruit (Saoirse Ronan).


Stoddard and Stalker embarked on a journey of violent threats, script rewrites, illegitimate children and, for some reason, numerous mentions of a dentist to finally find the truth. It seems everyone had a bone to pick with Köpernick, only making the network of potential suspects wider and wider.

As stated earlier, we are drowning in an endless sea of ​​mystery stories. At this rate, it takes a pretty remarkable script to keep things fresh and actually surprise an audience with a thriller. It’s especially difficult when you’re calling back to the genre’s earlier traditions while still meeting the expectations of a modern audience.

RELATED: ‘See How They Work’: Release Date, Cast, Trailer & Everything We Know So Far

See how they work, unfortunately, does not live up to this standard. It’s charming, it can be funny at times, and there’s a phenomenal cast who all seem to be having a really good time with it (maybe aside from Rockwell, more on that later) but it lacks an exciting, shocking or even decent crime novel. I don’t know if he’s trying to make a meta commentary on the state of the mystery genre and one of its adjacent true-crime contemporaries, and I can’t go into that without spoiling, but it falls to dish. The actual thriller lacks bite or “I should have known!” All you have to do is think “Oh… is that it?” It’s never a good sign when you’re expecting another plot twist because the first one is so satisfying and that’s what I told myself during the big reveal – “Please , tell me there is more to it.” Without any spoilers, it’s easy to shock audiences by paying little attention to certain characters who end up playing a bigger role, but it feels like a cheap loophole to fool audiences rather than a clever, cohesive mystery. .


The script doesn’t rely on tension throughout, instead relying on the red herring trope to keep the audience guessing. Sure, you still need it, but a red herring should always give way to an even more exciting truth. Yes, you might not see the actual thriller coming, and it’s bound to have an interesting backstory, but it’s so hidden from the public that it offers no ultimate reward. A satisfying, unsuspecting, and thrilling mystery is no easy task, but it’s the central driving force behind the narrative, making it easy to let the rest of the film crumble if it doesn’t deliver what all the fuss is about. history was built.

Perhaps the biggest disappointment is the lack of character detail. We hardly know any of them and yes we need an air of mystery so we don’t leak the game too quickly but if you don’t let the public know who they are dealing with they won’t care not. who is behind the murders. Ditto for our central cop pairing. To have a memorable mystery, you need an outstanding detective, and Stoddard and Stalker lack layers or depth – they feel as flat as the faceless characters they investigate.


Of Ruth Wilson at Harris DickonsonAmong the Oscar-winning and nominated headliners, there’s no denying that See how they work boasts an impressive cast, and this type of film sees a change in Ronan’s usual role choices. Of course, she did comedy with lady bird, but it’s the first time she’s fully leaned into a less serious role and unsurprisingly, she kills it. Even more impressive when the script gives him little to work on. The jokes she made can sometimes sound like they came out of a Christmas cookie – “What part of France are you from, sir?” she asks a hotel manager, “Belgium” he replies curtly. They laugh but in a more harmless way with dad’s humor. Either way, Ronan is engaged, and it’s just another reminder that there’s literally nothing the actress can’t do.


The great tragedy of the film is Rockwell. Watching him in this role is like a caged animal desperately trying to escape. Rockwell has proven over the past two decades that he is a tour de force character actor and his range knows no bounds. Here he has no decor to chew on. He’s a tired, drunk, bored cop who’s seen it all before. Sure, it makes for a fun juxtaposition with Ronan’s sunny, ambitious Stalker, but it takes away from everything we’ve come to the Rockwell movie for. Also, the seasoned disgruntled expert versus the doe-eyed rookie is one of the most overused character tropes in the mystery genre. Although you have two of the most talented actors working today, the characters just don’t come to life the way good detectives should.

The star is undoubtedly Oyelowo, and the British actor is obviously enjoying being on a lighter fare. He plays the famous writer with an air of glamorous arrogance and with an elegant and tasteful flamboyance, reminiscent of the less masculine icons of classic Hollywood like Laurence Oliver. For a film about the theater, Oyelowo happily brings the theatrics, every line rolling over his tongue as smooth as his gelled hair and mustache. It makes you wonder what could have been if he had played Poirot in Kenneth BranaghChristie’s recent adaptations.


In all, See how they work is an amalgam derived from too much homage and too little originality. Don’t get me wrong, it’s fun and the perfect movie to bring your Nana to, but it’s ultimately pretty forgettable. It kills two hours, and it’s worth checking out just for the casting itself – especially Ronan, as it’s always fun to see such a talented actor try his hand at something new. But for dedicated mystery fans who are constantly on the lookout for something fresh and new, keep looking.

Evaluation: VS

See how they work hits theaters September 16.

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5 horror movies set in the desert https://mondovino-lefilm.com/5-horror-movies-set-in-the-desert/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 20:01:00 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/5-horror-movies-set-in-the-desert/ Horror movies can take place in any type of environment, from the classic haunted house to the outer reaches of space. However, it’s often useful to tell a scary story in a place that would already be dangerous, unpleasant, and gruesome, even without any tunnel horror moving through the sand. When most people think of […]]]>

Horror movies can take place in any type of environment, from the classic haunted house to the outer reaches of space. However, it’s often useful to tell a scary story in a place that would already be dangerous, unpleasant, and gruesome, even without any tunnel horror moving through the sand.

When most people think of a horror movie set in the desert, they probably imagine the stories of adventurers battling mummies in Egypt. While the sands of Giza certainly have a long history of scary tales, almost a third of planet Earth is desert and each region has its own horrors.

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RELATED: Hydrophobia: 5 Horror Movies That Set On Water

Tremors

One of the quintessential films of American horror cinema, this 1990 monster flick sickens a mess of giant worm monsters in a small desert town in Nevada. SS screenwriters Wilson and Brent Maddock initially pitched the film as a group of people trying to escape the wrath of land sharks. Director Ron Underwood developed the concept into a slightly more realistic creature, leading to the iconic Graboids. This simple cult classic spawned a franchise, with five direct-to-video sequels under its belt. However, none of these follow-ups live up to the original. The story of a group of simple people trying to survive their encounter with the horror of the tunnels is funny, scary, charming and timeless. Even 32 years later, Tremors is about as much fun as a horror movie can get.


Carriers

This movie was made in 2006, but it’s a little unpleasant on the nose when viewed in 2022. This grim tale of a global viral outbreak is far more extreme than the ongoing pandemic humanity finds itself in, but the images of people wearing masks wielding bleach struck differently. Carriers follows a handful of people who desperately cling to a strict set of rules in the wake of an apocalyptic plague. All hope is lost, so the film’s heroes set to work escaping to a beach that once brought them loneliness. Unfortunately, they encounter one problem after another as they attempt to navigate a desert highway. The real horror of the film isn’t the disease, it’s the complete collapse of basic humanity it causes, leaving everyone to figure out what they’ll do when pushed to the brink. It’s a dark film with an air of heavy cynicism about it, but for those who can stomach it, it’s also a well-crafted experience.


dust devil

Richard Stanley has one of the strangest career trajectories of any filmmaker in the business. It started with a few well-received shorts. He raised the capital to do a few passion projects, both of which became cult classics. Then he moved on to the big-budget HG Wells adaptation that went so horribly wrong that the lost version he tried to make became the basis for a hit documentary. More than two decades passed before he returned to lead color out of spacea widely acclaimed Lovecraft adaptation he later revealed would be the first in a trilogy. dust devil is the second of his early cult classics and the last film he directed before The island of Doctor Moreau. dust devil adds a supernatural twist to the story of a series of murders in Namibia. It’s a compelling film with some really effective horror elements that show what Stanley might have been like without New Line Cinema and Val Kilmer.


Southbound

Anthology horror movies have a solid and rich tradition of some excellent entries topping the mountain of terrible. Southbound brings together directors to tell interconnected stories that take place on the same desolate stretch of desert highway. With talents like Roxanne Benjamin, who directed the best part of XXand David Bruckner, who directed the best part of V/H/S, Southbound is a reference in the genre. Only, the stories aren’t separate shorts, they’re incomplete fragments of clearly larger stories. It’s a riveting and engaging way to string five haunting, well-executed horror stories together. This 2015 movie comes with a tight 90 minute runtime, the biggest problem with it is that it will leave every audience asking for more.


The pyramid

Found images aren’t finished as a gimmick, they’re just not as boring as they used to be. If modern filmmakers need a handy “what not to do” guide, look no further than this 2014 disaster. The pyramid is the first feature film by Grégory Levasseur, whose career includes many great films and many major failures. It’s the latter. The pyramid follows a handful of documentarians in search of a hidden secret within one of Egypt’s iconic monuments, only to uncover a nightmare hidden within. Anyone who came across John Erick Dowdle As above, so below could experience a real deja vu, despite the movies being released less than four months apart. The pyramid isn’t a great movie, but it’s worth watching, just for the wild choices it makes in its later acts. It’s a lot funnier than scary, but the big swings he takes at some of his ideas make him interesting.

MORE: Disconnect: 5 Underrated Horror Movies From The Internet

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‘Pearl’: Review of Venice | Comments https://mondovino-lefilm.com/pearl-review-of-venice-comments/ Sat, 03 Sep 2022 21:58:08 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/pearl-review-of-venice-comments/ Dir: Ti West. WE. 2022. 105 min. A horror spin-off that feels like both a lark and a serious attempt to deepen a murderous character, pearl is a terrific showcase for actress and co-writer Mia Goth, playing the role of a young woman whose grip on her sanity is rapidly slipping. Ti West’s prequel to […]]]>

Dir: Ti West. WE. 2022. 105 min.

A horror spin-off that feels like both a lark and a serious attempt to deepen a murderous character, pearl is a terrific showcase for actress and co-writer Mia Goth, playing the role of a young woman whose grip on her sanity is rapidly slipping. Ti West’s prequel to Xwhich opened in March, veers away from that film’s slasher sensibilities, turning to a gripping study in weirdness that only belatedly produces the kind of shocks one might expect – but when they do, they’re more emotional than is often the case for this blood-soaked genre. This new installment stands out with its own disturbing and strange merits.

A gem of its kind

Screening in Venice and Toronto — the latter festival screening the film in its Midnight Madness section — pearl opens in the United States on September 16. X grossed around $16 million worldwide on a shoestring budget, with West shooting the follow-up in secret at the same time. No question pearl will be a niche business proposition, but although familiarity with X will certainly help potential audiences, viewers could walk into the new film cold and still be satisfied enough with its fascinating portrayal of madness.

Set in 1918 – during another pandemic, the Spanish flu – pearl features Goth as the title character, who was the main antagonist of the 1979 set X. Living at home with her crippled father (Matthew Sunderland) and repressive and harshly critical mother (Tandi Wright), Pearl feels abandoned and longs for her husband Howard, who has gone to fight in the First World War. But once she falls in love with the handsome, anonymous projectionist at her local theater (David Corenswet), she begins to dream of a life away from her small town; her aspirations bolstered by an upcoming audition to be part of a traveling dance troupe.

X paid homage to 1970s horror classics, so much so that it was almost as if the film was a forgotten relic of the era. For pearlWest cited various cinematic benchmarks – in particular, live-action Disney family films such as Mary Poppins — and there’s a dark edge of satirical menace running through this prequel, which at times seems to be hard-wired into Pearl’s fragile mental state. At first it’s clear that this woman is deeply disturbed – most people don’t kiss with random scarecrows – but pearl keeps viewers nervous as we slowly begin to recognize the extent of his delusions and frantic need to be loved.

West, who wrote the screenplay with Goth, gives the proceedings a just-for-fun slack without succumbing to smug self-indulgence. Although pearl certainly enjoys gently ridiculing the apparent cuteness of early 20th century Americana, there’s a bit of spice to the story as well. The parallels to our own paranoid pandemic era are obvious, but the image’s sun-splashed images are often offset by the growing darkness swirling inside Pearl. Her closest friend, pretty blonde sister-in-law Misty (Emma Jenkins-Purro), is such a positive person that she initially seems like someone who could pull Pearl from the brink. Instead, Misty’s fate becomes one of the film’s most heartbreaking sequences, with West’s deceptively simple directing belying the amount of craftsmanship that goes into the moment’s brutal outcome.

Goth resists horror movie clichés while depicting Pearl’s building psychosis. There’s an internal logic to the character’s festering angst, despondency and rage all tied into one utterly believable package. Whether it’s delivering a cathartic monologue or performing a decidedly demented dance number, Goth keeps Pearl grounded just enough that when the inevitable killing spree begins, we understand what drove her to it – even though some of her victims don’t deserve his wrath. It has become strictly for the actors to talk about being invested in making their villains “likable”, but Goth does indeed manage to turn Pearl into some sort of tragic character – a deeply unhappy person desperate to become one of those stars she sees on the big screen, cursed never to know so much fame and fortune.

His small-scale ambitions, pearl nonetheless features strong supporting turns, including newcomer Jenkins-Purro as Rosy Misty, who realizes too late just how damaged Pearl really is. And Wright sinks her teeth into a prototypical tyrannical mother role, giving our heroine plenty of reasons to want to break free. On paper, it’s just one more horror movie about a tormented individual who eventually breaks down, but pearl turns out to be a little pearl of its kind.

Production Company: Little Lamb

International sales: A24, sales@a24films.com

Producers: Kevin Turen, Harrison Kreiss, Jacob Jaffke, Ti West

Screenplay: Ti West & Mia Goth

Director of photography: Eliot Rockett

Production Design: Tom Hammock

Editing: Ti West

Music: Tyler Bates, Tim Williams

Main Cast: Mia Goth, David Corenswet, Tandi Wright, Matthew Sunderland, Emma Jenkins-Purro

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‘Love in the Villa’: Netflix Meets Hallmark Channel https://mondovino-lefilm.com/love-in-the-villa-netflix-meets-hallmark-channel/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 07:03:17 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/love-in-the-villa-netflix-meets-hallmark-channel/ There are romantic comedies that will remain etched in my memory all my life, such as “While You Were Sleeping” and “Music and Lyrics”. And I’m not saying they are the best. They aren’t as popular or critically acclaimed as “Crazy Rich Asians”. They’re just the ones that resonate with me. “Love at the Villa” […]]]>

There are romantic comedies that will remain etched in my memory all my life, such as “While You Were Sleeping” and “Music and Lyrics”. And I’m not saying they are the best. They aren’t as popular or critically acclaimed as “Crazy Rich Asians”. They’re just the ones that resonate with me. “Love at the Villa” won’t make my list, but that doesn’t mean it’s a bad movie per se, or that it won’t be on someone’s list.

When it comes to genres, romantic comedy is perhaps one of the most subjective. All films are subjective, of course. But the more I watch, the more I find romantic comedies, as a genre, to be slightly more subjective than others.

Every romantic comedy fan has a few titles that transcend the word “favorite.” They have a few cozy flicks that connect with the heart on a deeper level and generate the unique feeling of comfort that lets them curl up on the couch with a fluffy blanket, a glass of wine, and a pair of slippers.

These are movies where the Rotten Tomatoes score is unspoken language and the opinion of others is questionable. I’m talking about romance movies that weave one-to-one relationships with their audience members. I think it’s abnormal.

As for Netflix’s latest rom-com, “Love in the Villa,” it looks like the streaming giant has reached into its spice cabinet and added a Hallmark twist. Except it’s not a Christmas movie.

The story follows a Minneapolis third-grade teacher named Julie (Kat Graham) who is obsessed with “Romeo and Juliet.” She’s been saving up for years and planning the perfect trip to Verona, Italy with her boyfriend when he suddenly dumps her just before the trip.

Determined to have fun, Julie arrives in Italy after a 22-hour journey from hell filled with screaming babies and lost luggage. Finally, at her villa where she expects to rest, Julie is shocked to find a half-naked Briton named Charlie (Tom Hopper) in the space she has rented. Turns out the one bedroom villa is booked as a double.

And that provides the setup for this little story. It is neither dramatic nor original. But I appreciate that the film doesn’t try to make the narrative more than it is. It allows the main characters to take the lead and be what ultimately makes or breaks the story.

Charlie is in town working for a wine festival, and Julie is trying to attend all those romantic Romeo and Juliet related tours, as well as some of the typical tourist attractions. The pair try to drive each other out of the villa by prank-warring each other until they escalate too far and the police – er, polizia – arrive.

From there, most people can probably guess where the story is going. The couple is sunny, spending time together and slowly but surely getting closer. Like I said, “Love in the Villa” doesn’t serve up a new recipe. It’s not about trying to innovate in new territory. He knows exactly what it is, a simple and comfortable romantic comedy.

Some of the jokes fit perfectly with Charlie’s dry British audacity and Julie’s initial lack of fortune. Other moments feel a little forced. Luckily, those moments don’t last long and the movie continues.

The main strength of “Love in the Villa” comes from Graham and Hopper. It took me a little longer to figure out these characters because I kept seeing witch Bonnie from “The Vampire Diaries” and strongman Number One from another popular Netflix title “Umbrella Academy “. And since I had only recognized Hopper immediately in that title, I had no idea that he was in fact English.

When I finally settled into “Love in the Villa,” I saw Graham and Hopper make a cute pair. It’s not Sandra Bullock and Bill Pullman, but they do the work for this particular title. And that brings me back to where I started.

I really believe in the increased subjectivity of rom-coms for fans of the genre. Because usually, if you poll Western fans and ask them what the best Western title is, I think you’ll find a handful of common titles (and 1960’s “The Magnificent Seven” would probably be among them). If you ask fans of psychological thrillers what is the best psychological thriller, again, you’ll find a handful of common titles, “The Silence of the Lambs”, probably among them.

But if someone were to conduct this same experiment among rom-com fans, I don’t think there would be as much consensus. Every rom-com fan would have their own favorites, and I bet there would be more selections out of left field than is generally thought. Example… “While you were sleeping.” How many rom-com fans have this in the top spot on their list? (If this is yours, feel free to email me at [email protected] to tell me. We can exchange thoughts on Sandra Bullock.)

“Love in the Villa” is accompanied as a bonus by beautiful cinematography by Jose David Montero. And while I don’t often write about wardrobes in movies, Graham’s outfits looked just as good as she wore them. Hats off to Giovanni Lipari’s costume design. It’s not often that I notice outfits enough in a movie to notice them.

People looking for a cozy rom-com should find exactly what they’re looking for in “Love in the Villa.” It is now available on Netflix.

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Weird Al Movie Trailer: Daniel Radcliffe, Evan Rachel Wood Star https://mondovino-lefilm.com/weird-al-movie-trailer-daniel-radcliffe-evan-rachel-wood-star/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 15:12:00 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/weird-al-movie-trailer-daniel-radcliffe-evan-rachel-wood-star/ Daniel Radcliffe straps on his accordion as parody artist “Weird Al” Yankovic in the new trailer for “Weird: The Al Yankovic Story.” “Weird” is set to premiere on Roku’s free streaming channel on November 4, but will screen a little earlier as the opening film of the Toronto International Film Festival’s Midnight Madness programming series […]]]>

Daniel Radcliffe straps on his accordion as parody artist “Weird Al” Yankovic in the new trailer for “Weird: The Al Yankovic Story.”

“Weird” is set to premiere on Roku’s free streaming channel on November 4, but will screen a little earlier as the opening film of the Toronto International Film Festival’s Midnight Madness programming series on September 8. .

Billed as the “untold true story” of Yankovic, the film explores the parody musician’s life and career, including his “raunchy celebrity romances and depraved lifestyle.” A parody of the biopic genre, the film tells a more fictionalized account of Yankovic’s rise to stardom, featuring many of his early hits such as “Like a Surgeon” and “Eat It.”

In addition to “Harry Potter” star Radcliffe as Yankovic, the film also features Evan Rachel Wood as Madonna; Quinta Brunson as Oprah Winfrey; Rainn Wilson as broadcaster Dr Demento; and Julianne Nicholson and Toby Huss as Yankovic’s parents, Mary and Nick.

“Weird” is directed by Eric Appel, who co-wrote the film with Yankovic himself. The film comes from Funny Or Die and Tango.

Yankovic is a five-time Grammy winner and the best-selling comedy recording artist of all time. Along with producing hits like “White & Nerdy” and “Another One Rides the Bus,” the comedian-singer’s 2014 release “Mandatory Fun” earned him his first No. 1 album on Billboard’s Top 200.

“When my last movie ‘UHF’ came out in 1989, I made a solemn vow to my fans that I would release a great movie every 33 years like clockwork,” Yankovic said in a statement in January.

Watch the full trailer for “Weird: The Al Yankovic Story” below:

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