Film review – Mondovino Le Film http://mondovino-lefilm.com/ Thu, 12 May 2022 11:42:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/lefilm-150x150.png Film review – Mondovino Le Film http://mondovino-lefilm.com/ 32 32 Vortex Review – Gaspar Noé’s stunning split-screen descent into dementia | Movies https://mondovino-lefilm.com/vortex-review-gaspar-noes-stunning-split-screen-descent-into-dementia-movies/ Thu, 12 May 2022 09:50:00 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/vortex-review-gaspar-noes-stunning-split-screen-descent-into-dementia-movies/ gaspar Noé casts his ferocious and cauterizing gaze on the spectacle of old age: the world of those who are about to enter the void. He brings a particular structural insight to it that I don’t think I’ve ever seen represented so clearly. Dying is Bifurcated: A real-time split-screen experience split between the caregiver and […]]]>

gaspar Noé casts his ferocious and cauterizing gaze on the spectacle of old age: the world of those who are about to enter the void. He brings a particular structural insight to it that I don’t think I’ve ever seen represented so clearly. Dying is Bifurcated: A real-time split-screen experience split between the caregiver and the person being cared for. An old married couple, people who have had a lifetime of wondering which of them will die first and which of them will have to bear the burden of care, find that it is not so clear during the terrible end of part itself.

Veteran director Dario Argento and actress, screenwriter and director Françoise Lebrun play a couple who live together in a chaotic little Parisian apartment covered in a pleasant jumble of books and papers. He’s obviously a filmmaker or maybe a writer, working on a book about cinema and dream called Psyche; she is a retired psychiatrist. They have a son, Stéphane (Alex Lutz) who is himself the father of a little boy, struggling with drugs, money and marital problems. The film opens – ominously – with a music video of Françoise Hardy performing the 60s song Mon Amie la Rose, about the mortality of flowers. Then Argento and Lebrun have a modest meal on their rickety terrace: these are Lebrun’s last moments of lucidity. We learn that she suffered a stroke a few years ago and has since descended into dementia; recently the rate of decline has accelerated.

Noé divides the screen in two, two stories that unfold simultaneously, showing in one half the character of Argento thoughtfully tinkering about the apartment, in denial of what is happening: reading, dozing, banging on his typewriter manual and also leave surreptitious phone messages, like a teenage boy in love, for a woman called Claire whom he has been miserably in love with for decades. Meanwhile, on the left of the screen, the character of Lebrun, with the impassive and leonine expression of those suffering from dementia, wanders the streets without telling her husband, or throws away all her notes, or dangerously leaves the gas lit, all in a miserable fog of ignorance.

Stéphane comes to see them, upset by what is happening, and by his own inability to convince them to enter a retirement home; it’s a subject complicated by his own history with his psychiatrist mother, struck by the fact that he and they now live in a world of drugs, legal and illegal. Noé will periodically concoct a camera cut in either frame and pick up from another point of view; occasionally the two scenes overlap, creating a Hockneyesque perspective dissonance. Brutally, the medium is the message. These two people will never share the same screen again.

It’s a film without the pornographic, psychedelic sheen of Noah’s earlier work, but those earlier images had a recurring trick: to force the audience to the brink of nausea by having them stare into a vortex of flickering strobe light. In this film, death is the vortex: the dark focus, whose gravitational pull grows stronger – and harder to avoid thinking about – with each passing year. And Vortex tells us something else about old age, which a severe and haughty film like Love by Michael Haneke would not grasp: death is chaotic, like life. It ends with things undone and in a messy mess. It is a work of winter maturity and true compassion.

Vortex hits theaters May 13.

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A wild piece of sci-fi movie history https://mondovino-lefilm.com/a-wild-piece-of-sci-fi-movie-history/ Mon, 09 May 2022 23:20:00 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/a-wild-piece-of-sci-fi-movie-history/ “Multipass”. Milla Jovovich as Leeloo in The fifth Element.Picture: Sony Pictures A few years before thim a bullets dodged in The matrix where Darth Maul emerged in The Phantom Menacea red-haired savior named Leeloo said “mmaster key. The 90’s were a wonderful time for sci-fi fans, with instant hits like jurassic park and independence day […]]]>

Leeloo holding a multipass.

“Multipass”. Milla Jovovich as Leeloo in The fifth Element.
Picture: Sony Pictures

A few years before thim a bullets dodged in The matrix where Darth Maul emerged in The Phantom Menacea red-haired savior named Leeloo said “mmaster key. The 90’s were a wonderful time for sci-fi fans, with instant hits like jurassic park and independence day and The matrix and Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace. But buried among them all, almost unassuming, were Luc Besson’s freaks, handsome The fifth Elementand today we have the impression of being in a film very stuck in the middle of a movement.

When The fifth Element was released on May 9, 1997, 25 years ago today, it was a solid hit. With a big budget of around $90 million, it grossed over $260 million worldwide. In the United States however, it only made $60 million, relegating it closer to cult status than mega-blockbuster. And revisiting the film a quarter century later, you see why. it’s a roll coaster of tone and intention that makes it felt incredibly unique but also naturally polarizing.

Beginning in Egypt 1914, The fifth Element instantly hits audiences with a ton of mythology. We learn that every 5,000 years, an unspeakable evil appears in the universe, and only an almighty being is called, you guessed it, tThe fifth element can stop it. Massive aliens then show up and explain that evil is still 300 years away. History then fast forwards 300 years and the Fifth Element emerges as a young woman named Leeloo (Milla Jovovich) who literally falls into the life of Korben Dallas (Bruce Willis). Korben is a taxi driver who was a special forces officer; through a largely silly set of circumstances (which include supporting characters played by Gary Oldman and Ian Holm), he finds himself protecting Leeloo as they go on a mission to obtain the other four elements, unite them, and save the galaxy.

Korben in a black short-sleeved coat

Bruce Willis as Korben Dallas in The fifth Element.
Picture: Sony Pictures

There are many, many a lot more is happening in The fifth Element, but that’s the basic framework. And, for the first 30 minutes or so, it all feels cohesive, methodical, and familiar. Your basic sci-fi, save-the-stuff of the world: one futuristic setting, reluctant hero, powerful but mysterious woman, etc. But at some point, essentially the moment Korben is forced to shove five people into the bowels of his one-room apartment to maintain a ruse, The fifth Element starts to move. What started out as a more serious, traditional sci-fi story becomes an almost absurd, slimy comedy. There are jokes, goofy situations, and general weirdness culminating in the introduction of Ruby Rhod, played by Chris Tucker.

Ruby Rhod is basically a hyper-energetic 23rd century Howard Stern. He’s an ultra-popular radio host who runs around commenting on what’s happening live for the whole galaxy to hear, and his manic energy combined with machine gun dialogue smells good The fifth Element in the face. Even after a few humorous scenes, once Ruby arrives you almost don’t believe you’re still watching the same movie, which is both refreshing but also a bit confusing. You can’t help but be wowed by the larger-than-life character that bursts onto the screen, but it briefly distracts of everything else. Fortunately, soon after, The fifth Element gets back on track and begins to regain the tone it started its story in with-youhat from a more traditional sci-fi action movie.

See again The fifth Element for the first time in two decades, it was these radical swings that marked me. They felt so bold, so brave, but only partially successful. Which, in a way, is The fifth Element in its entirety. Scenes spanning centuries, with intergalactic travel, cool weaponry and flying car chases, feel like a natural progression from films such as Total recall, stargate, or independence day at the level of history. But visually, it dwarfs those films exponentially. The film’s production design, costumes, and special effects are all beyond spectacular. Every choice Besson makes regarding the appearance of the film is 100% The fifth Element. You’re never going to look at Leeloo’s costume or Ruby’s hair and mistake it for another movie. It is a unique and stunning vision.

ruby in a screaming leopard print

Chris Tucker as Ruby Rhod in The fifth Element.
Picture: Sony Pictures

A few years later, however, films like The Matrix, The Phantom Menace, and The Lord of the Rings would similarly embrace this epic, brash, and unique style of worldbuilding. Of course, part of it was based on the previous IP address, but the scale of The fifth Element, and its release a few years before those mega-hits, almost feels like Hollywood needed to step up a gear from the sci-fi of years past. The film is like permission to go a little bolder, a little wilder, and we haven’t looked back since.

East The fifth Element really so influential? It’s hard to say. But 25 years after its release, the film’s beautiful, messy nature certainly seems extremely transitory. It has elements that are perfectly 1997 and others that are more 2022. Together, this mix of past, present, and future can be a little difficult. But there is little doubt that globally, The fifth Element was ahead of its time in good and bad. That makes it just as fun to watch and talk about now as it was then.

The fifth Element is currently streaming on Prime Video and Paramount+.


Want more io9 news? Find out when to wait for the last wonder and star wars versions, what’s next for the DC Universe in Film and TVand everything you need to know about Dragon House and The Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power.

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An average movie that boasts a stellar cast https://mondovino-lefilm.com/an-average-movie-that-boasts-a-stellar-cast/ Sun, 08 May 2022 11:30:00 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/an-average-movie-that-boasts-a-stellar-cast/ Release date: 04/29/2022 Cast: Liam Neeson, Guy Pierce, Monica Bellucci, Ray Stevenson Director: Martin Campbell I’ve been a Liam Neeson fan ever since I was blown away by Taken (Pierre Morel, 2008). It was more or less a benchmark for me and my friends during our college days and whenever there was a new action […]]]>
  • Release date: 04/29/2022
  • Cast: Liam Neeson, Guy Pierce, Monica Bellucci, Ray Stevenson
  • Director: Martin Campbell

I’ve been a Liam Neeson fan ever since I was blown away by Taken (Pierre Morel, 2008). It was more or less a benchmark for me and my friends during our college days and whenever there was a new action movie hitting the streets there was only one question – is- this as good as Taken? Neeson starred in a series of sequels to Taken which gradually deteriorated. Building on the success of Takenother directors took over the basic formulas of the film in their own stories that took place in cities, planes, trains, trucks and even a freezing hell. Neeson maintained his enthusiasm in these performances and in each of these films, he was by far the best thing about it all.

Unfortunately, with MemoryI think the character and personality of Neeson who was born with Taken have finally reached their end. When he was killed off in the movie, I felt like that marked the end of both the on-screen character as well as recurring characters that Neeson had been playing in different variations since Brian Mills had threatened his daughter’s kidnapper at the phone and delivered on his threat.

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Movie review: CODA beautiful in every way https://mondovino-lefilm.com/movie-review-coda-beautiful-in-every-way/ Fri, 06 May 2022 19:00:00 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/movie-review-coda-beautiful-in-every-way/ Sian Heder receives the Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay for CODA at the 94th Academy Awards. Photo/Getty Images CODA (PG-13, 91 min), now streaming on Apple+Directed by Sian Heder Stranger stories are everywhere. Strangers are bullied in the playground, ostracized, mocked. Then someone in the wider community comes to their senses, especially after the stranger […]]]>

Sian Heder receives the Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay for CODA at the 94th Academy Awards. Photo/Getty Images

CODA (PG-13, 91 min), now streaming on Apple+
Directed by Sian Heder

Stranger stories are everywhere.

Strangers are bullied in the playground, ostracized, mocked. Then someone in the wider community comes to their senses, especially after the stranger in question shows a particular talent, how accepting and inclusive someone becomes, and others follow suit.

CODA is an underdog story, based on La Famille Bélier (Éric Lartigau, 2014), a drama about a deaf family, but CODA is a cut above most films, including underdog films, and a much improved version of the original.

In the hands of writer/director Sian Heder and the hands of scruffy, often rude but always attractive fisherman Frank Rossi (Troy Kotsur), CODA conveys no message to viewers. Instead, it transforms into a half-open door that gently invites viewers to come in and see for themselves. You’ll laugh a lot and wake up well a few times too.

It’s easy to see why CODA won Oscars for Best Picture and Best Adapted Screenplay, along with 14 other awards in 2022.

Like Kotsur, two of the other CODA actors, Daniel Durant and Marlee Matlin (Best Actress, 1987 for Children of a Lesser God), are deaf from birth.

Claiming his Best Supporting Actor Oscar, Troy Kotsur signed, “This is for the deaf community, the CODA community, and the disabled community. This is our time.”

What an achievement.

Frank Rossi is married with two children. One of his children, Leo (Durant) was born deaf like Frank and his wife Jackie (Matlin). The other child is Ruby (Emilia Jones), their hearing child, a child of deaf adults. It is a close family, in social and financial difficulty.

In an unusual selfish move, Ruby joins the school choir and bonds, in a way, with fellow student Miles (Ferdia Walsh Peelo). Under the inspiring teaching of Bernardo Villalobos (Eugenio Derbez), who believes in Ruby as a talented singer and a whole person, Ruby shines, but she is torn between having her own life and her responsibilities to her family.

Both Sides Now by Joni Mitchell and All I Need To Get By by Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell take on another meaning in the context of the wonderful CODA. Ruby and Miles take these songs and elevate them, in a quiet, subtle way that doesn’t shy away from making an impact.

Kotsur is remarkable as a horny husband, a fisherman ill-equipped to meet the demands of listeners, a father who needs his hearing daughter to translate for him, but sees her need to fly away from the family nest. His remarkably expressive signature hands flutter like little birds.

CODA is magnificent in every way. And it will change your understanding of what makes our world what it is. Ideal viewing during New Zealand Sign Language Week, May 9-15. To have

• Movies are categorized as Avoid, Recommended, Highly Recommended, and Must See.

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Film Review: Official Competition – InDaily https://mondovino-lefilm.com/film-review-official-competition-indaily/ Wed, 04 May 2022 03:54:41 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/film-review-official-competition-indaily/ A wealthy Spanish businessman in need of an inheritance considers a bridge bearing his name but settles for a film starring the two greatest actors of the time, directed by a woman so pretentious that she seeks the inspiration by making word associations in the tube of a vacuum cleaner while lying on a concrete […]]]>

A wealthy Spanish businessman in need of an inheritance considers a bridge bearing his name but settles for a film starring the two greatest actors of the time, directed by a woman so pretentious that she seeks the inspiration by making word associations in the tube of a vacuum cleaner while lying on a concrete floor.

It’s a movie about making a movie that manages to be satirically nonsensical without abandoning the core truths underneath.

The rich man’s vanity project features Spanish actors Antonio Banderas and Oscar Martínez in all their true stardom, while the rival male marquee names Felix and Ivan, with Penélope Cruz as the mad director, Lola. Without these three, Official competition would struggle for the dynamism it achieves. Seeing serious actors playing ghastly versions of themselves is the strength of a film that laughs at the hand that feeds it.

Felix and Ivan are polar opposites: Felix is ​​loud, sexy – like an aging movie star with a Maserati – and deliberately provocative in the vocal warm-up he does while shouting into Ivan’s noble face, a much more serious theatrical actor who does not need such pretensions. This is the key to their rivalry; one is more famous, the other better actor. From now on, they must embody two brothers at war in a family saga supported by a man who does not know who they are.

Lola, whose massive head of unruly curls marks her as a author, decides that the way to bring out the best in actors is to crush their egos, which she does in such a literal way that they are left speechless. Talk to the producers, she says, when they threaten to sue — she’s just doing her job.

He is full of that kind of vanity; the acting techniques and selfish undermining we suspect happens behind the scenes more often than anyone admits. Lola’s refusal to let Ivan go past the first line of his script until he says it with only the right intonation is devilishly clever, and credit to the luminous Cruz for pulling it off.

The jokes are all inside, raising the question of how appealing it will be outside of the festival audience.

Moviegoers will find plenty to savor in three excellent actors who wrestle with ideas of ego and insecurities as they play caricatures of themselves. For others, a nonsensical movie within a movie about a movie made for all the wrong reasons may not yield many overt laughs – but it does deliver three very attractive stars who are remarkably easy on the eyes.

The official competition is screened at various times during the Moro Spanish Film Festival, which takes place at the Palace Nova Eastend cinema until May 18.

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This article is supported by the Judith Neilson Institute for Journalism and Ideas.

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Wild Men review – the world’s worst Viking comes off the grid | Movies https://mondovino-lefilm.com/wild-men-review-the-worlds-worst-viking-comes-off-the-grid-movies/ Mon, 02 May 2022 15:01:00 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/wild-men-review-the-worlds-worst-viking-comes-off-the-grid-movies/ YesYou wouldn’t think it was possible to accidentally commit armed robbery. But that’s exactly what happens to poor, distraught Martin when he gets into an altercation with a gas station attendant while dressed as a Viking in animal fur, with an ax in hand. Martin fled to the snowy mountains to hunt, feed and find […]]]>

YesYou wouldn’t think it was possible to accidentally commit armed robbery. But that’s exactly what happens to poor, distraught Martin when he gets into an altercation with a gas station attendant while dressed as a Viking in animal fur, with an ax in hand. Martin fled to the snowy mountains to hunt, feed and find the meaning of life. The catch is that his survival skills are more Alan Partridge than Bear Grylls – hence the foray into the gas station for beer and chips.

Danish filmmaker Thomas Daneskov’s deadpan comedy about midlife crisis has some brilliantly absurd moments like this. Rasmus Bjerg plays Martin, who has tried half marathons and road cycling but still feels dead inside. Announcing to his long-suffering wife, Anne (Sofie Gråbøl of The Killing), that he is going to a team-building seminar, Martin instead travels to Norway to fulfill his Viking fantasies. Bjerg’s performance is spot on, playing it delightfully straight as this gormless bumbler, who goes full Fred Flintstone with his ridiculous animal skin costume but can’t bear to part with his iPhone. Daneskov frames Bjerg’s large, expressive face against the majestic icy landscape for maximum comedy.

Martin has been living as the world’s worst Viking for about a week and has just robbed the gas station when he comes across Musa (Zaki Youssef), a weed dealer injured in a car accident. This is roughly where the police get involved and the film shoots Fargo style. Bjørn Sundquist is terrific as Øyvind, a retired-age police chief with Jack Nicholson eyebrows and a penchant for fly-fishing. Every time he asks for the police sniffer dog, Øyvind gets the same answer: it’s the mutt’s day off. There are some very funny scenes and a reasonably tense gunfight finale – even if the sentimental ending felt a bit like a cop-out to me. And it’s a shame that Gråbøl (wearing a junk sweater) ends up with an uninspiring role as Martin’s wife.

Wild Men is in theaters May 6.

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Review of “The Kids in the Hall: Comedy Punks”: the best Canadian comedy https://mondovino-lefilm.com/review-of-the-kids-in-the-hall-comedy-punks-the-best-canadian-comedy/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 17:23:00 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/review-of-the-kids-in-the-hall-comedy-punks-the-best-canadian-comedy/ Viewers before them had first-generation “Saturday Night Live” and “SCTV.” But five Canadian guys turned out to be “sort of the only comedy group that reflects Generation X,” as fan Fred Armisen puts it in “The Kids in the Hall: Comedy Punks.” Reg Harkema’s documentary is an airy and worthy glimpse into a collective career […]]]>

Viewers before them had first-generation “Saturday Night Live” and “SCTV.” But five Canadian guys turned out to be “sort of the only comedy group that reflects Generation X,” as fan Fred Armisen puts it in “The Kids in the Hall: Comedy Punks.” Reg Harkema’s documentary is an airy and worthy glimpse into a collective career now approaching its 40th anniversary.

Although best enjoyed by already converted, it provides enough showbiz information and interpersonal drama to keep newbies entertained. It will provide both camps with an appetizer for the kids’ limited-run reboot of their original sketch series, new episodes of which (featuring an array of named guest stars) will launch May 13 on Amazon Prime, followed by this doc. a week later (on May 20).

When they were all in their early twenties, Mark McKinney and Bruce McCulloch met in 1981 through a Calgary comedy improv group, as did Dave Foley and Kevin McDonald in Toronto the following year. By 1984, the two units had heard enough about each other to meet and then begin performing under the name “Kids” (borrowed from Jack Benny patter). Their ranks were rounded out in 1985 by Scott Thompson, a drama student who “wanted to be James Dean”, but quickly revised his goals after seeing the other four. “By the time they invited me, I wasn’t going anymore,” he says in recent interview footage shot with the quintet at the Rivoli club in Toronto.

It was there that they scored a residency, honing their number for a paltry audience over several months. Picking up the best accumulated material for a refined show, they suddenly find themselves sold out every night. A rave review from “Globe & Mail” caught the eye of an “SNL” talent scout. After producer Lorne Michaels had them do a lot of hoop jumping, it eventually led to the debut of their self-titled show on HBO and CBC in 1989. Despite the praise, it was actually canceled at the end of the first season. — until a well-timed CableACE Award provided Michaels impetus to overturn that decision.

“The Kids in the Hall” immediately kicked TV comedy up a notch, feeling both laid back and surreal, clannish and lovable. Unlike the contestants, he was not interested in current political events, pop culture riffs, or much scatological humor; his nervousness seemed less indebted to the stand-up than to the ironic, sad and absurd banter between friends.

Favorite personalities emerged, such as McKinney’s berserk “Chicken Lady” and misanthropic “Headcrusher”. But the show didn’t trade catchphrases or trending gags so much as ridiculous but often oddly poignant character dynamics, emphasizing human failings — a “cavalade of bad parents,” alcoholism, l ‘homophobia, etc., behaviors rooted in members ‘mainly suburban circles. Paul Bellini, contributing writer, said, “They wanted to make a comedy that both upset and please people at the same time.”

This extended to using “homosexuality as a weapon to hit the squares”, as gay member Thompson put it. This manifested itself most outrageously in her celebrity-obsessed barfly, Buddy Cole, an “alpha queen” whose supreme self-confidence turned the stereotype into a sign of freshness. Such inclusivity allowed the group to incorporate even risky topics like AIDS, because they laughed at the taboo, not the topic itself. Among the many comedians interviewed here citing the Kids as inspiration are comedic women who endorsed the group’s myriad distaff roles, which were funny without making the femininity itself “the joke.” “They just played the women as characters. They were real, they were grounded,” Lauren Ash says.

“Comedy Punks” marches methodically through the next four seasons, growing in strength and (increasingly expensive) imagination. But the airing of 20 half-hour episodes a year, along with live broadcasts and other obligations, began to stir up discord as well as exhaustion within this “comic arm of the grunge movement”. They decided to call it quits, but then got a late and unexpected go-ahead for the 1996 feature ‘Brain Candy’ – an unfortunate experience for all, in part because Foley had already abandoned ship for the ‘NewsRadio’ sitcom. . It was also not a commercial or critical success, despite building a cult following since.

However, after each turning in different directions, the Kids realized that they all missed working together. This, combined with the growing popularity of Comedy Central reruns, led to reunion tours, the 2010 miniseries “Death Comes to Town” (a sustained mock murder mystery tale), and current activities. Indeed, they seem so happy in each other’s company now that it’s hard to believe they’ve ever hit on each other’s throats.

While we hear of some collaborators (notably the no-frills Michaels), the main voices here, aside from the Kids themselves, are fellow performers. Some, like Mike Myers, have actually eclipsed their fame, but all remain hugely impressed with the troupe’s innovation and skill.

The fast-paced doc enjoys access to plenty of archival footage beyond the original series, dating back to videotaped club performances in the early ’80s. so short that they only elicit acknowledgment smiles – such character-based situational humor doesn’t really play ideally out of context. But then many viewers will remember that background, and the documentary will surely send back more than a few for marathon re-watches.

Currently premiering at Hot Docs (and in its previous premiere at SXSW) as a feature, “Comedy Punks” will be available on Amazon Prime in two separate parts of the same total length.

“The Kids in the Hall: Comedy Punks” will be available exclusively on Amazon Prime starting May 20.

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Acharya Movie Review, US Premiere Updates, Report https://mondovino-lefilm.com/acharya-movie-review-us-premiere-updates-report/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 23:24:24 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/acharya-movie-review-us-premiere-updates-report/ LOWER RESULT Mega bore OUR RATING2/5 CENSOR2h 34m, Certified ‘U/A’. What is the film about? The temple city of Dharmasthali is under the tyrannical rule of Basava (Sonu Sood). Acharya (Chiranjeevi) comes unassumingly to the village, which does not oppose him. How does Acharya create fear in Basava? What is his connection to Siddha (Ram […]]]>

LOWER RESULT

Mega bore

OUR RATING
2/5

CENSOR
2h 34m, Certified ‘U/A’.


Chiranjeevi Movie Review - AcharyaWhat is the film about?

The temple city of Dharmasthali is under the tyrannical rule of Basava (Sonu Sood). Acharya (Chiranjeevi) comes unassumingly to the village, which does not oppose him. How does Acharya create fear in Basava? What is his connection to Siddha (Ram Charan) is the basic story of the film.

Ram Charan - Acharya Movie ReviewPerformances

Megastar Chiranjeevi is known for his inimitable on-screen style and energy, no matter what role he tries out. Likewise, Koratala Siva is known for his unique hero characterization as seen in all of his films. In Acharya, Chiranjeevi molds him to be a hero of Koratala Siva. The result is that we see Megastar stripped of his usual energy and free flow.

Chiranjeevi is seen playing a passive-aggressive character in Acharya. The intensity is there (visible in the fights), but the energy is missing. When it encounters a routine and predictable scenario, there is virtually no impact. It’s as if Chiranjeevi goes from one action block to another with nothing exciting or fun to do in between. What we have at the end is a long-forgotten exit from the star.

Coming to Ram Charan, it appears in the second half and takes us back to the time of the Racha Trilogy. It’s not a bad performance but a perfectly routine act. One can see and feel the difference between his recent releases and Acharya. It’s definitely not a release to remember, especially after Rangasthalam and RRR.


Director Koratala Siva - Acharya Film ReviewAnalysis

Four old films, Koratala Siva, directs Acharya. In a short time, it has created a unique niche with its story, writing and presentation that sets it apart from the crowd.

Acharya takes Koratala Siva back to his Mirchi days. This is mainly due to the completely predictable scenario which lacks freshness. Remember that Mirchi was a made-to-kill plot dealing with an endless clash between two villages. What made the difference was the presentation and the writing. The hero looked very fashionable, and the mass elements worked exceptionally well. Koratala Siva tries the same with Acharya but fails on the script.

Acharya’s story is as predictable as it gets. We know from the introduction of Dharmasthali and Basava where this is heading. A “hero” enters space to save the day. Chiranjeevi is presented in a stylish avatar and does a fabulous action. However, when it comes to writing, Koratala Siva fails, and with it the element of freshness disappears.

A low-key Chiranjeevi with no depth of writing, a familiar story and formulaic phrasing make for a subpar first half. It would not be an exaggeration to say that this tests patience. The connecting tissue between sympathetic action sequences is missing. As a result, one is never really invested in the procedure, even when heavy actions occur.

Towards the interval there is some momentum and a surge of hope bearing in mind that the second half will see the presence of Ram Charan. We sincerely hope for a reinforcement of energy and strength in the second half.

Unfortunately, the second half goes deeper into the sewers. There’s virtually nothing memorable about either the writing or the performance. We have more problems thrown our way and the heroes fight through them and carry the message of ‘Dharma’.

Still, we wait patiently, hoping that there will still be some combined scenes between Chiranjeevi and Charan that will offer some respite. Unfortunately, Koratala Siva does not use them. Other than the brief snippet of the song “Bhanjara,” there is no interesting moment featuring the father and son duo.

The amusing banter between Chiranjeevi and Charan during the fight sequence shows how ignorant Koratala Siva is in the use of the star pair. It’s ridiculous in idea and terrible in execution.

The climax is long and the emotions feel like an endless saga. Therefore, it wouldn’t be a surprise if one decides to go out to the point of not waiting for the end of the film. It is tiring and taxing on patience.

Overall, Acharya is undoubtedly Koratala Siva’s weakest work by far. It fails to use the stars at its disposal and gives them lifeless, dull and tiresome cliche action drama. Even die-hard fans will find it hard to watch the movie in its entirety.


Pooja Hegde - Acharya Movie ReviewInterpretations by other actors

Other than Chiranjeevi and Ram Charan, there are hardly any roles worth mentioning. Everything is half cooked. No wonder Kajal’s part was removed entirely. Pooja Hegde, too, doesn’t have much to do other than appear as Charan’s love interest.

Sonu Sood is Acharya’s main villain. He is doing his usual and is doing well. Kishore, seen in a small role, is adequate. Vennela Kishore, Nassar and others are wasted on unimportant roles.

Music Director-ManisharmaMusic and other departments?

Mani Sharma’s music is quite ordinary. Except ‘Laahe Laahe’ and ‘Bhanjara’, there is nothing to mention. The senior musician has failed a lot in his comeback track with the greatest opportunity. But, the music isn’t the biggest disappointment; it is the background score in which the musician specializes. Maybe it’s the last-minute rush with post-production or some other technical issue; the BGM is disappointing and fails to lift the procedure. There is no top whatsoever.

Thiru’s cinematography is polished, capturing forest locations and lush greenery. The colors, with their dark hues, bring a unique texture to the unfolding. Navin Nooli’s editing is correct. The VFX work is poor and gives a tacky vibe to the part-procedure. So much has been said about the artwork, but there is hardly any feeling of an inhabited village. We can feel the artificial environment throughout.


Strong points?

banjara song
Some action blocks

Disadvantages?

Predictable story
Routine emotions
Boring formal narrative
bad handwriting


Sonusood-Acharya Movie ReviewAlternate plug

Like many other films before it, Acharya itself feels like a reworking of a film in another language. In this case, it seems to be loosely inspired by the Bollywood movie, Farishtay.

Did I enjoy?

Nope

Will you recommend it?

Nope

Acharya movie review by Mirchi9

Final report:

Koratala Siva fails spectacularly! Despite having a rare combo and two big stars at his disposal, he fails to deliver a half-decent moment involving the two. An outdated story and poor writing make it hard for Acharya to watch a movie in its entirety.

– ‘Bhale Bhale Banjara’ doesn’t have crazy visuals, but the Chiru-Charan duo pull off a visual feast with their simple yet graceful steps.

— Acharya’s second half has begun. Siddha (Ram Charan) is a great believer in ‘Dharma’.

First semester report:

A few blocks away, the first half of Acharya tests patience due to Chiranjeevi’s lack of aggression. A lot of heavy work needs to be done in the second half, with the job now falling squarely on Ram Charan.

– Ram Charan gives a very brief introduction as a Siddha. That’s all for the moment.

— The temple city Dharmasthali is under the atrocities of Basava (Sonu Sood). Acharya started to straighten things out.

— Laahe Laahe is the first song in Acharya. Megastar’s graceful footsteps do the trick for Manisharma’s typical melody number.

— Acharya takes off at Dharmasthali. Mahesh Babu opens the show with his voiceover.

— Acharya Streaming Partner: Amazon Prime Video

Acharya Review, US premiere updates will begin soon. Stay tuned.

Megastar Chiranjeevi’s long-delayed film Acharya is finally ready to hit screens on April 29th. The specialty of the film is the first combination with his son Ram Charan under the direction of Koratala Siva.

Usually, Acharya will be considered a hit outing on the strength of the suit alone. However, the delay and release of Pan-India films before him took away a lot of the shine. Acharya is now looking at a reasonably good opening at best.

What is up for grabs for Acharya has to do with his long term. This means that the discourse he gets becomes critical. If positive, it is likely to be the new non-RRR hit. It also means a 100Cr hat trick to share movies for Megastar Chiranjeevi.

However, Rajamouli’s hero feeling sets in as almost everyone failed after achieving success with the star director. Charan had an Orange if you remember. Can he overcome the feeling with Acharya must be seen.

In short, it’s Chiranjeevi and Koratala Siva’s hit streak against Rajamouli’s sentiment. Acharya’s largest USP is therefore the center of attention.

Mani Sharma provides music to Acharya. Matinee Entertainment and Konidela Productions are jointly producing the large-scale biggie. Pooja Hegde will be seen in an extended supporting role opposite Ram Charan.

As always, Mirchi9 will give you a sincere and honest Acharya “First-On-Net” review. Watch this space for our updates.

This week’s releases on OTT – Check the “Ranking” filter

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‘The Offer’ review: The classic movie that almost wasn’t https://mondovino-lefilm.com/the-offer-review-the-classic-movie-that-almost-wasnt/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 22:41:00 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/the-offer-review-the-classic-movie-that-almost-wasnt/ Spoiler alert: “The Godfather” has been made. Non-spoiler alert: in “The Offer”, it is almost not. Followers of “The Godfather”, and we are legion, will find the entire drama series in 10 episodes – brought to you by the studio that almost didn’t make the film – not only impossible to refuse, but agonizing: A […]]]>

Spoiler alert: “The Godfather” has been made. Non-spoiler alert: in “The Offer”, it is almost not. Followers of “The Godfather”, and we are legion, will find the entire drama series in 10 episodes – brought to you by the studio that almost didn’t make the film – not only impossible to refuse, but agonizing: A World Without Francis Ford Coppola’s masterpiece? The film that may well be the crowning achievement of American cinema? Unthinkable. And yet, in the early 70s, it was very thinkable. In fact, the series implies more than the fact that the film was a series of small miracles from the moment it emerged from Mario Puzo’s pulpy novel until the night he won the Best Picture Oscar in 1972. Like it never happened, Michelangelo may have fallen from the scaffold, Mozart may have been born of a butcher, Ronald Reagan may have fact played out in “Casablanca”. The way masterpieces happen is usually the result of serendipity, d pitfalls avoided, stupidity avoided. “The Offer” lists all of this.

The offer

Starts Thursday, Paramount+

The series, created by Michael Tolkin, carries a very unusual source credit – “Based on Albert S. Ruddy’s experience in creating ‘The Godfather'”. Unsurprisingly, Mr. Ruddy (now 92) is the hero of the play, portrayed with heroic nerve and considerable charisma by Miles Teller (“Whiplash”), as a producer who overcomes the myriad human obstacles. preventing the Corleone family’s emigration from page to page: Supreme Chairman Robert Evans (Matthew Goode) is desperate to save his ailing studio, but not so desperate that he won’t tax his wife, Ali MacGraw (Meredith Garretson), to director Arthur Hiller (Jake Regal) for the lead role in “Love Story.” Mafia boss Joe Colombo (Giovanni Ribisi) uses his fledgling Italian-American Civil Rights League to convince America that the Mafia doesn’t exist, which “The Godfather” insists does. Charles Bluhdorn (Burn Gorman), head of Gulf+Western (which then owned Paramount), is inclined to go along with the charming Ruddy, though his unctuous civil servant, Barry Lapidus (Colin Hanks), undermines the film at every turn.

Meanwhile, a pair of like-minded foodies—Puzo (Patrick Gallo) and Coppola (Dan Fogler)—are holed up in Hollywood, eating cannoli and sweating out one of the greatest movie storylines of all time.

One wonders if Coppola’s real life will endorse “The Offer,” because tonally it’s all over the place. Mr. Goode is perhaps the most entertaining element of the series, his perfect imitation of Evans, from the nasal singing to the cheerful Hollywood smarm. But between this performance and that of Mr. Ribisi – of whom Colombo is a stupid-minded, if ruthless, thug – the mood is often farcical. Mr. Ruddy’s rise from a programmer at RAND Corp. to the producer of “Hogan’s Heroes” to his eventful meeting with Evans which is unplanned (by Evans), passed, very economically, in the midst of a small riot of Hollywood parties, pretty people and cliches. At the forefront of these, the romance that imposes itself on us, between Ruddy and Françoise Glazer (Nora Arnezeder), owner of Château Marmont, to which “The Offer” pays a visit. Françoise is an increasingly big drag on the story and feels even more unlike Juno Temple’s Bettye McCartt, the secretary who knows everything the very green Ruddy doesn’t and guides him through his first big picture. Mrs. Temple, as “Ted Lasso” fans know well, is a natural phenomenon.

Matthew Goode


Photo:

PARAMONT+

Messrs. Goode and Teller are top notch, as is Stephanie Koenig as casting director Andrea Eastman. Mr. Ribisi is oddly convincing and Mr. Gorman’s Bluhdorn is a bit of a grotesque, a man who doesn’t exactly abuse his power but indulges his weaknesses, including Bettye. Ultimately, it’s the gnome Mr. Fogler who is really at the heart of the series as Coppola, the accomplished and determined artist.

It’s a Ruddy-centric story, however, and one will constantly wonder how boldly the producer overcame some of his film’s difficulties – his grace under pressure is a la Hemingway; it is as mild as Genco olive oil. And it has plenty of problems: Frank Sinatra (Frank John Hughes), who has ears for the mafia, hates the book because of the character of Johnny Fontane; corrupt Bronx deputy Mario Biaggi (Danny Nucci) obstructs the film at the behest of the five families, including capo di tutti capi, Carlo Gambino (Anthony Skordi), was the alleged inspiration of Vito Corleone. Colombo, who becomes Ruddy’s ally, comes under mob fire for attracting too much attention. And Marlon Brando (Justin Chambers) presents his own set of tailor-made eccentricities.

Patrick Gallo and Dan Fogler


Photo:

PARAMONT+

Much of the film’s backstory will be known to the fanbase, but the fun is watching the lore come to life, however awkwardly; lines of Godfathers I and II appear throughout the series. Mr. Chambers, reenacting Brando’s famous “audition” for Coppola and Ruddy, is a revelation. Anthony Ippolito is a wonderfully restless Al Pacino, initially turning down the role that would make him a star. Plenty of real people, living and dead, are trashed in “The Offer” – Sinatra, Biaggi, Crazy Joe Gallo (Joseph Russo) and Gianni Russo (Branden Williams), who played convict Carlo Rizzi, are portrayed as particularly vile. But if they were getting in the way of “The Godfather,” maybe they deserved it.

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Penn State Football Movie Review | Why Jaquan Brisker is a top safety in the 2022 NFL Draft | Pennsylvania State Football News https://mondovino-lefilm.com/penn-state-football-movie-review-why-jaquan-brisker-is-a-top-safety-in-the-2022-nfl-draft-pennsylvania-state-football-news/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/penn-state-football-movie-review-why-jaquan-brisker-is-a-top-safety-in-the-2022-nfl-draft-pennsylvania-state-football-news/ Jaquan Brisker became a true field general during his time at Penn State. He can cover any position, can get in the box and defend the run, and has the athleticism to chase a 68-yard run after starting on the wrong side of the field. Listed at 6-foot-1.5 and 206 pounds on Penn State’s pro […]]]>

Jaquan Brisker became a true field general during his time at Penn State.

He can cover any position, can get in the box and defend the run, and has the athleticism to chase a 68-yard run after starting on the wrong side of the field.

Listed at 6-foot-1.5 and 206 pounds on Penn State’s pro day, Brisker is a rare height for someone at safety, reminiscent of the former LSU star, No. 6 overall and NFL All-Pro Jamal Adams.

He finished second among all safeties in the NFL Combine with 22 reps off the bench and 11th in the 40-yard dash. He also overcame a poor 34.5-inch vertical jump at the combine with a mark of 38.5 inches on the pro day, which would have tied for second in Indianapolis.

Beyond his physical traits, Brisker has proven time and time again that he studies filmmaking and understands acting as much as anyone.

Various NFL Draft-projection outlets have Brisker with a late first-round and early second-round rating, but nearly all of the top projections have him out of the board on Day 1.

Here’s what makes the former Lackawanna College transfer one of the best at his job.

game recognition






As mentioned above, Brisker has proven his knowledge of the game.

In that game-breaking interception against Wisconsin earlier this year, he starts play in the box, reads quarterback Graham Mertz’s eyes, and floats above the seam road to secure the takeout.

Brisker explained in postgame media that it was a look the Badgers had been trying to get all day, and he knew the fourth pass was heading for the tight end. Obviously, he wasn’t lying.

Midway through the year, Brisker again explained in interviews once during his time at Lackawanna where he told his fellow linebacker what play was coming. This resulted in an interception in a close moment of the game.

Lackawanna head coach Mark Duda told the Daily Collegian last fall that the defense wasn’t called on that play — everything was Brisker.







breakerfr2

On a critical third down late in the second quarter against Iowa this year, Brisker sniffed a wide receiver screen before the ball was even out of the hands of quarterback Spencer Petras.

His speed made the game a total disaster, as Iowa didn’t have enough blockers to cover Brisker.

The receiver and tight end were responsible for the two defenders closest to the sideline. The tight end might have had to see off Brisker and switch assignments, but it’s a tough split-second decision that changes what you’ve been practicing for months.

Brisker came screaming downhill way too fast for an offensive lineman to get in front of him as well.

Physical







breakerfr3

This game could easily have been added under the “game recognition” subheading, but we’ll put it here under physicality.

It’s not often you can say that teams shouldn’t block a defensive back with a tight end or a fullback, but you really shouldn’t block Brisker with a tight end or a fullback.

He saw the screen expand on this play as the Auburn wide receiver took a single step and flew through the tight end to make the tackle for the loss. His use of leverage and contact acceleration is textbook.







breakerfr4

Michigan State running back Kenneth Walker has 89 tackles — the most of any running back in the nation in 2021 by a healthy margin. He didn’t come out of this one from Brisker.

Brisker pushed his feet on contact again, and he held Walker long enough for the rest of the Nittany Lions to watch the takedown.

Cover

Brisker really does nothing wrong. It certainly doesn’t cover badly.

According to PFF, he has the highest coverage level among safeties since 2019 at 92.2 and hasn’t given up a touchdown in 713 coverage snaps (that’s good).

Since 2019, Brisker’s only leading safety in the passer rating is Notre Dame’s Kyle Hamilton, who is expected to land in the first half of the first round of the NFL Draft.







breakerfr5

Brisker excels in man and area coverage. Against Auburn’s Kobe Hudson with the game on the line on fourth base, he won the 1-on-1 battle.

He can use his hands to press just as well as anyone in his place. Hudson and the Auburn faithful likely wanted pass interference on this play, but it appears Hudson pulled Brisker with him after he fell, not the other way around.







breakkerfr6

In zone coverage, Brisker uses his closing speed, physicality, game recognition and ball skills.

In this clip against Iowa, he read Petras’ eyes and raced for the ball to quickly shut down what looked like a weak spot in the Penn State area.

Brisker attacked the ball at its peak and deflected the pass in another critical third down.

Outside of Micah Parsons, Brisker might be the most day one Penn State prospect ready to contribute to the NFL in a while. He has few weaknesses and many strengths.

Hamilton and Georgia’s Lewis Cine are the most beloved at safety, but don’t count Brisker as one of the best defensemen in this draft.

MORE FOOTBALL COVERAGE


Penn State Football Draft Profiles |  Jaquan Brisker has all the attributes NFL teams look for in a safety

Penn State Chief of Defense Jaquan Brisker, a fifth-year senior safety, enters his…

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