los angeles – Mondovino Le Film http://mondovino-lefilm.com/ Sun, 20 Mar 2022 02:50:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/lefilm-150x150.png los angeles – Mondovino Le Film http://mondovino-lefilm.com/ 32 32 Courteney Cox asked the directors not to kill a single character https://mondovino-lefilm.com/courteney-cox-asked-the-directors-not-to-kill-a-single-character/ Sat, 19 Mar 2022 22:52:00 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/courteney-cox-asked-the-directors-not-to-kill-a-single-character/ Scream star Courteney Cox reflects on her request that the filmmakers not kill off a fan-favorite character in the latest slasher episode. Warning: Contains SPOILERS for Scream (2022). Courteney Cox begged the directors for 2022 Yell to keep a major character alive in the film. The fifth installment of the hit slasher-comedy series was released […]]]>

Scream star Courteney Cox reflects on her request that the filmmakers not kill off a fan-favorite character in the latest slasher episode.

Warning: Contains SPOILERS for Scream (2022).

Courteney Cox begged the directors for 2022 Yell to keep a major character alive in the film. The fifth installment of the hit slasher-comedy series was released earlier this year to critical and box office acclaim, leading to renewed popularity in the Yell franchise and a sixth film to start production this summer. Cox has confirmed that she will return for Cry 6but sadly without a single actor: her longtime co-star and former husband, David Arquette.

Cox and Arquette appeared in all five Yell films since 1996 as Gale Weathers and Dewey Riley, respectively. The franchise, originally helmed by the late Wes Craven, was known for its mix of scares and laughs, satirical takes on horror tropes, and cementing Ghostface as a now-classic movie villain. The fifth film, simply titled Yellalso managed to bring a lot of tears when the filmmakers decided, opposed by Cox, to kill Dewey d’Arquette, a longtime fan favorite and ex-husband of Cox’s Gale.

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Related: Scream 2022: Billy Loomis Arc Changes Iconic Villain’s Legacy

On the latest episode of the podcast Just for variety (via EO), Cox explained how she felt about the character’s shocking death. While she praised the film’s directors Matt Bettinelli-Olpin and Tyler Gillett (collectively known as Radio Silence), Cox disagreed with their choice to have Dewey killed by Ghostface. Cox even suggested, on set, that the directors might even shoot an additional scene teasing Dewey’s survival. Cox’s commentary on Dewey’s death can be read below:

It was sad, because Dewey is such a beloved character and he’s so goofy, and I thought he brought such a comedic touch to the whole franchise. I think that was really – that was a negative.

I remember being on the pitch saying, ‘I just thought it was a big mistake not having the option. I understand why you want [to do it] – that makes him really serious. But then wouldn’t it be great if just [in] last three minutes: text from the hospital. I wanted this to happen.


The Scream 2022 Original Dewey Plan Made His Death Even Better

Cox is not alone, as many Yell fans felt that Dewey’s death was either too devastating or even undeserved. Dewey and Gale’s romance, which began in the original 1996 film, was considered the heart of the franchise, and his death made it even more heartbreaking. Although Dewey managed to narrowly avoid death several times in previous films, Radio Silence and writers James Vanderbilt and Guy Busick felt that 2022 Yell was essential to kill the beloved”inherited trait,as mentioned in the movie, to make the story work. With this new change, it leaves Cry 6 with Cox as the witty Gale Weathers and co-star Neve Campbell as the iconic “last girl” Sidney Prescott returning to a world without their beloved Deputy Dewey, making their legacy trio the end.


With Yell further popularizing the trend of “requels” (sequels that are also mellow remakes) in film, the idea of ​​a much-loved legacy character getting killed was understandably controversial among fans and cast members, but not rare. As established in Cry 3one of the rules was “Anyone, including the main character, can die.” which, even though it was made for what was originally a trilogy, still applies to the future of Yell. Will Courteney Cox and Neve Campbell’s returns for episode six be the last series of their beloved characters? Will Gale Weathers or Sidney Prescott join Dewey Riley as one of the next major deaths? The idea may be too much for diehards to handle Yell fans, but not impossible.


More: Jenna Ortega’s Horror Movies Prove She’s The New Scream Queen

Source: Just for variety (via EW)

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‘The Outfit’ a new twist on the gangster movie genre | Way of life https://mondovino-lefilm.com/the-outfit-a-new-twist-on-the-gangster-movie-genre-way-of-life/ Sat, 19 Mar 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/the-outfit-a-new-twist-on-the-gangster-movie-genre-way-of-life/ Oscar-winning filmmaker Graham Moore wanted to bring a new flair to the gangster movie genre. The Columbia University graduate makes his directorial debut with “The Outfit,” a crime drama about a Chicago tailor whose main clients are ruthless mobsters. The story came to fruition after Moore and co-writer Johnathan McClain became interested in London’s famous […]]]>

Oscar-winning filmmaker Graham Moore wanted to bring a new flair to the gangster movie genre.

The Columbia University graduate makes his directorial debut with “The Outfit,” a crime drama about a Chicago tailor whose main clients are ruthless mobsters.

The story came to fruition after Moore and co-writer Johnathan McClain became interested in London’s famous Savile Row couture district and began scouting the industry for a potential film.

Moore fashioned the title character after his grandfather, whom he described as an honest man who ran a medical practice in a small town where notorious Genovese mobster Jerry Catena was a patient.

“The first bug the FBI ever planted in its history was to hit the mob, and they planted it in Chicago in 1956 in a tailor’s shop,” Moore said. “Once we read that, we lit up. It was like, ‘Oh, this is the movie!’ This is a man like my grandfather: some kind of gentle soul who makes these clothes for vicious killers.

In theaters now, “The Outfit” stars Mark Rylance as a former Savile Row tailor named Leonard who operates an upscale boutique in Chicago where the deep-pocketed mobsters who buy his suits are the only ones to buy. keep it in business.

“All he wants to do is lock himself in his shop and make these beautiful things, and he wants to pretend the outside world doesn’t exist,” Moore, 40, said of the character. “He wants to pretend that some of the violence and danger that lurks right outside the door doesn’t exist.

“The problem with that is that it doesn’t work. You can’t do that,” Moore said. “The bad people are out there, and the violent people are out there, and at some point they’re going to come knocking on your door, and then Leonard, like everyone else, has to make a decision about what to do. do about it.”

Moore, who was born in Chicago, won the Best Adapted Screenplay Oscar in 2014 for the World War II drama “The Imitation Game,” starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Keira Knightley.

The filmmaker said he wanted “The Outfit” to pay homage to classic Alfred Hitchcock thrillers such as 1948’s “Rope” and 1954’s “Rear Window.”

“We wanted to make a movie that would keep audiences guessing until the very end,” Moore said. “It’s a piece of the puzzle, but not quite a thriller. We talk about it a lot like a chess match. Each character in the film has their own agenda. Every character in the movie is lying about something.

Moore was thrilled to have the chance to work with Oscar winner Rylance, whom he hailed as “the best actor in the world.”

“Mark is an expert craftsman himself,” Moore said of the actor who won his Oscar for ‘Bridge of Spies.’ “Like our title character has dedicated decades and decades of his life to perfecting the craft of tailoring, I think Mark has dedicated decades and decades of his life to completely perfecting the craft of acting.”

Moore, who now lives in Los Angeles, spent 10 years in New York and said his studies at Columbia helped him become a thorough researcher.

“I tend to work on these historical pieces, or pieces like this that are inspired by a real event,” Moore said. “I learned so much from my time there about how to approach research on a huge topic.”

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‘A Lot Of Nothing’ Movie Review: SXSW – Deadline https://mondovino-lefilm.com/a-lot-of-nothing-movie-review-sxsw-deadline/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 22:44:05 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/a-lot-of-nothing-movie-review-sxsw-deadline/ Racial divides, distrust, and misunderstandings get exuberant, if understandably inconclusive, training in a lot of nothing, a dynamic and moving feature debut from Mo McRae which had its world premiere at South by Southwest in the Narrative Feature Competition section. Layers of suspicion, animosity and aggressive feelings come and go as an upscale black couple […]]]>

Racial divides, distrust, and misunderstandings get exuberant, if understandably inconclusive, training in a lot of nothing, a dynamic and moving feature debut from Mo McRae which had its world premiere at South by Southwest in the Narrative Feature Competition section. Layers of suspicion, animosity and aggressive feelings come and go as an upscale black couple from Los Angeles welcomes another couple and, unexpectedly, a lower class white cop who pays the price for what he did the night before. After a powerful first act, this rambunctious work is forced to downshift somewhat as it seeks some sort of conclusion that won’t be too clumsy or simplistic given the complex dynamics at hand. While it doesn’t end on a high note, it is nonetheless an exciting and explosive piece that heralds a dynamic talent that isn’t afraid to tackle thorny issues head-on.

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Co-written by McRae, who has starred in numerous TV shows, including ongoing roles in the likes of Sons of Anarchy, murder in the first, almost family and The stewardessand Sarah Kelly Kaplan, the film has fun subverting expectations and putting the characters, and therefore the audience, in uncertain territory as often as it can. While the drama comes to feel increasingly forced and contrived towards the end, it also serves to surprise, unnerve, and create ambiguity, mostly to good effect.

In a tense and choppy 20-minute pre-opening credits, we don’t see much of what happened, but the gist of it is that a policeman – specifically, a lower-class white cop who lives on the same street – has, evidently, needlessly killed a child, presumably black, and subsequently behaves belligerently. The working premise is that this is another outright murder by a racist cop who won’t pay the price for a spectacular overstepping of legal boundaries.

That’s certainly the attitude of Vanessa (Australian actress Cleopatra Coleman), an elaborately adorned beauty who insists that her husband James (Y’lan Noel, of TV show Insecure), a big-money corporate lawyer , take a gun in hand, go to the side and read the pig the riot act. She’d like it even better if he were to just hook the guy up in some justifiable revenge, and the cop’s restless, uncooperative state does nothing to support an alternative view of his mindset.

Shoving a moving camera into the middle of it all with impressive grace, McRae and cinematographer John Rosario strongly relay the tensions that run through the couple’s minds and hearts, which are so restless they result in an unexpected sexual episode. On top of all that physical action and emotional disruption, Vanessa’s brother Jamal (Shamier Anderson) and his wife Candy (Lex Scott Davis) have dinner, setting the table for what suddenly feels like a play.

As a result, the dialogue – full of fury, accusations, threats, hurt feelings, suspicions and general uncertainty about what to do – burns like wildfire. Furious Vanessa can’t help but go next door to confront the cop about what he’s done and when she does, the officer, named Brian (Justin Hartley), calls her crazy and threatens to arrest him. Raising the bar, she leaves and comes back with a gun and takes it to her garage, after which James, who isn’t happy about how far his wife has taken things, nevertheless records the cop in the garage where James’ Tesla is usually parked.

Although the contexts are entirely different, there’s a kind of cheap electric charge to the very elemental drama playing out here that reminds – like it or not –Fatal attraction. The similarity lies in the sight of attractive, well-to-do and normally civilized people stooping to something resembling wild animals. When first presented with these rarefied individuals, you never suspect they could so quickly be reduced to a bestial state, but McRae takes you there.

The couple is so absorbed by their unexpected guest that they have forgotten their guests, who arrive in due time. The situation could hardly be more embarrassing; While the cop stays tied up in the garage, James and Vanessa try to cook a meal they completely forgot about while the heavily pregnant Candy talks about all her food limitations. What up to this point has been highly charged, razor-edge drama suddenly turns a dramatic left into polite chatter, and it’s a transition the writers and director can’t entirely cope with. The drama that had been roaring for an hour suddenly becomes subdued, almost to a ridiculously absurd extent.

There are, of course, more twists to come regarding the unexpected guest in the garage, but a lot of nothing (a strange title) does not pay off as much as hoped after such a busy start. The plot starts to feel rather forced, and the final act’s change in tone doesn’t mesh well with what came before, leaving a somewhat disappointed feeling after the first few rounds of dynamite.

Yet the social and racial issues at the center of things have a real electric charge here, the performances exude considerable warmth, and the filming, especially in the first hour, immerses you in a sense of great intimacy with the characters. Everyone involved here, in front of and behind the camera, will be worth following to see what they do next.

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a guide to the films of Ryusuke Hamaguchi. https://mondovino-lefilm.com/a-guide-to-the-films-of-ryusuke-hamaguchi/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/a-guide-to-the-films-of-ryusuke-hamaguchi/ At a tense moment of drive my car— the film that took Japanese director Ryusuke Hamaguchi from festival circuit darling to four-time Academy Award nominee, including Best Picture and Best Director — one of the film’s main characters, a director himself, is faced with an incipient rebellion on his part cast. He puts on a […]]]>

At a tense moment of drive my car— the film that took Japanese director Ryusuke Hamaguchi from festival circuit darling to four-time Academy Award nominee, including Best Picture and Best Director — one of the film’s main characters, a director himself, is faced with an incipient rebellion on his part cast. He puts on a multilingual theatrical production of Anton Chekhov Uncle Vanya, and as the actors struggle to guess his intentions during the last of a series of tableau readings, he asks them to simply focus on the words in front of them. “We are not robots”, the actress playing rebels Sonya. How are we supposed to do better if we don’t know what you want? “You don’t have to do better,” replies the director. “Just read the text.

This exchange, a version of which also appears in Hamaguchi’s book Asako I & II, is as close to a mission statement as this unassuming master. Her films, four of which are now available to stream in the United States, vary widely in subject matter and tone – from a sprawling melodrama about middle-aged women to a sci-fi short in which a virus has brought society in the pre-internet era – but they share an understanding that emotion doesn’t need to be on screen to be felt by the viewer. Hamaguchi’s characters are often driven to despair, but they rarely shed as much as a tear, though it’s probably no coincidence that his international breakthrough is the exception to that rule. Although his films are not all as long as three hours drive my car-both Asako I & II and Wheel of Fortune and Fantasy arrive at two tidy o’clock, while happy hour is longer than those films combined – they all move at an equally measured pace, allowing us to settle into the journey rather than focus on where it’s headed. The world seems to have stopped, whether we’re living in a real-time moment or moving forward years to years, and when it starts again, we’re not quite where we started.

Here is a brief guide to Hamaguchi movies you can watch at home.

drive my car

Loosely based on a trio of stories by Haruki Murakami from the collection men without women, drive my car has racked up accolades since its Cannes debut last year, including Best Picture honors from the New York Film Critics Circle, the Los Angeles Film Critics Association and the National Society of Film Critics – the first time this trifecta winner was made by a film that is not in English. The story centers on Yusuke Kafuku (Hidetoshi Nishijima), a theater director who channels the grief of his wife’s sudden death into a production of Uncle Vanya, but even if the film is filled with melancholy, there is also a subtle playfulness, illustrated more succinctly by the fact that the opening credits are 40 minutes long. Kafuku’s process, in which the actors – a multilingual group who all perform in their native languages, including Korean Sign Language – read the play over and over until the words are incorporated into their bodies, mirrors that by Hamaguchi, as well as his interest in blurring the lines between fiction and documentary. There’s a lot of drama in drive my car, and not just Chekhov, as Kafuku accepts the idea that his marriage died long before his wife. But Hamaguchi’s dedication to letting the story’s revelations develop through sometimes elliptical conversations rather than forcing them to the surface gives them a unique, slow-burning power, and he understands like few filmmakers how the front half a car can be the most intimate of spaces, part traveling confessional and part-time machine.

Where to watch: drive my car is in theaters, is available to rent for $5.99, and as of March 2, just started streaming on HBO Max.

Wheel of Fortune and Fantasy

Wheel of Fortune and Fantasy Poster

As remarkable as drive my car‘s many accomplishments have been, it’s not even the only great Hamaguchi movie released in 2021. Wheel of Fortune and Fantasy is as succinct as its pandemic-era twin is sprawling, a series of three short stories loosely united around the themes of, to quote its Japanese title, “chance and imagination.” Compressed into 40-minute arcs, the film’s segments highlight Hamaguchi’s ease with gnarly romances and erotic tension, especially when expressed in words. (Its characters love sex, but they love talking about sex even more.) Each story is full of enough surprises that I wouldn’t risk spoiling their plots, except to say that they’re mostly built around intense conversations. two of the kind Hamaguchi excels at showmanship, and none of them end up where you think they will.

Where to watch: Wheel of Fortune and Fantasy is available for digital rental and purchase, and on Blu-ray from Film Movement.

Asako I & II

Poster Asako I & II

A recurring theme in Hamaguchi’s films is how the ghosts of past relationships can haunt us long after they’ve ended, sometimes years past the romances they represent. That idea finds its most literal expression in this 2018 film, whose title character falls madly in love with a mysterious drifter, is heartbroken by his abrupt departure, then picks up years later with a man who looks exactly like him. Of this quartet of Hamaguchis, Asako I & II is where the reserved acting style he favors serves the story the least well. As Asako, Erika Karata is enigmatic bordering on emptiness, staring into the distance when she’s supposed to fall in love at first sight. (To imagine Jules and Jim(Jeanne Moreau drained of her fiery brashness.) But as the plot unfolds, the inward-looking nature of the performance also takes on new layers. It’s like she’s gone through years of her life, to the point that she’s forgotten what true feelings are like. An early photo shows Asako and her drifting boyfriend sprawled on a road following a motorcycle accident, their faces placid as they stare unharmed into each other’s eyes. But they didn’t avoid impact entirely; it just takes a while to catch up with their bodies.

Where to watch: Asako I & II is available for digital rental and purchase, and with subscription to Criterion Channel, Mubi, Hoopla and Kanopy. Grasshopper Film Blu-ray and DVD includes an interview with Hamaguchi and his short film As if nothing had happened.

happy hour

happy hour poster

The film that first brought Hamaguchi to international fame is both a breakthrough and an anomaly. After making a trilogy of documentaries about the impact of the earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan’s Tohoku region in 2011, Hamaguchi was ambivalent about returning to the artifices of fiction. So he spent months running improv workshops with non-professional actors and developing a story about four Kobe women in their late thirties who come to terms with the state of their lives. The resulting 2015 film spans five hours, but for a film of that length, it’s particularly indifferent to its own length. Hamaguchi never tries to impress you with streaks that increase patience or make you bend under its cumulative weight. If anything, happy hour feels light on its feet, its length flowing organically from the situations it depicts. (By the time a character in their fifth hour comes forward to read a short story they’ve written, you know you’re going to hear it all.) A sequence, in which three of the characters take part in a Sunday after-workshop lunch organized around the idea of ​​”listening to your center” and sharing a drink after, takes almost an hour in itself, but it went by so quickly and was so captivating that I found myself standing after midnight just to see how things went.

contrary to drive my carthat enjoys the sustained viewing most easily obtained in a movie theatre, happy hour can be dipped in and out almost at will. It’s the rare film that deserves to be called a novel, not because it has epic scope, but because it works through the patient accumulation of detail rather than building narrative momentum or the juxtaposition of events. It’s a way of saying don’t let its length scare you off, but also that once you start watching it becomes a moot point.

Where to watch: happy hour is available for rental and purchase through digital retailers, although it is arbitrarily divided into three parts. You can also stream it for free with commercial breaks via Pluto TV and with a subscription to the Criterion Channel. (Note to the frugal moviegoer: a month of Criterion Channel costs less than renting all three parts of happy hour.) Kimstim’s Blu-ray and DVD include interviews describing the film’s unique production process.

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Dinner: The Ultimate Hangout Movie https://mondovino-lefilm.com/dinner-the-ultimate-hangout-movie/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 15:30:00 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/dinner-the-ultimate-hangout-movie/ What is a “dating movie?” While it might be a little hard to define, there are a few common characteristics that most dating movies share – the emphasis on well-drawn characters over plot, reliance on conversational dialogue to drive the action, a lightness of tone and stories that are often (but not always) about young […]]]>

What is a “dating movie?” While it might be a little hard to define, there are a few common characteristics that most dating movies share – the emphasis on well-drawn characters over plot, reliance on conversational dialogue to drive the action, a lightness of tone and stories that are often (but not always) about young people discovering their lives. Hangout movies also tend to have this general feeling that when you watch them, you’re not just witnessing contrived plot points happening to these characters, but you’re hanging out with them for a brief window as you watch them. going through a pivotal moment in their lives. It’s hard to think of a movie that embodies the hideout movie as much as it dinnera film that celebrates its 40th anniversary this year and has had a subtle but substantial influence on the hangout genre in the decades since its release.

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A thing that does dinner such a pivotal dating movie is how seemingly weak the plot is, and yet how it manages to weave all these different arcs for each character as the film progresses. dinner takes place between Christmas and the New Years of 1959 in that specific corner of Baltimore where six childhood friends spend the week hanging out in various capacities but always seem to end up at their local diner. The fact that one of these guys, Eddie (Steve Guttenberg), is about to get married, which goes a long way to explaining how his restaurant buddies struggle to embrace adulthood while unable to resist the playful immaturity of hanging out with their old pals in their old haunts.

RELATED: Barry Levinson’s ‘The Survivor’ Sets April Release Date on HBO

Corn dinner came just at the start of a golden era for the hideout movie, it was far from the first film to embrace this kind of shaggy, character-driven aesthetic. With its similar abundance of future stars and also set at this time before the cozy conformity of the 50s turned into the turbulence of the 60s, dinnerthe closest descendant is that of 1973 american graffiti. You can also see traces of the haunt film in many other 1970s New Hollywood films, which often emphasize character more than plot, whether Jack Nicholson vehicles like Five easy pieces Where Flight over a cuckoo’s nestor the twists and turns of the ensemble films of Robert Altman. However, unlike many of those 70s movies, dinner (and other dating movies of its day) weren’t about antiheroes who embodied the seedier side of American culture. They were characters in which you could recognize your own friends, even if a movie like dinner is incredibly specific to its time and place.



DINER-MOVIE-barry-levinson
Image Via MGM/United Artists Distribution and Marketing

The location, 1950s Baltimore, was all too familiar to the director Barry Levinsonwho had grown up in Baltimore and would shoot three of his next films (tin men, Avalonand Heights of Liberty) the. However, he had spent most of the 70s in Los Angeles, working on various television sketches and variety shows as a writer and occasionally an actor, eventually co-writing and making small appearances in the Mel Brooks movies strong anxiety and Silent movie. According to Levinson, Brooks was actually the one who encouraged him to put the stories he told of the guys he grew up with in a restaurant into a script. After writing the screenplay, Levinson decided to try directing the film himself despite having no directing experience, wanting to be able to recreate his own memories on screen with as much vividness and detail as possible. .


It’s in this liveliness and detail that you get a lot of the film’s charm, tapping into the idea that the more you do a specific story, the more universal it becomes. A lot of that specificity is in the banter that occurs between the characters when they hang out at the restaurant as well as the various other shenanigans they get into. There is one particular scene where the group of guys are discussing whether they prefer Frank Sinatra Where Johnny Mathis, which absolutely feels like a precursor to the kinds of pithy, pop culture-heavy dialogue that Hollywood would be awash with in later decades. But here, it feels like a completely natural extension of the characters’ interactions and their tunnel vision of what’s really important in their world. This is also why dinner embodies a certain type of dialogue that would become predominant in the modern haunt film, sounding not quite as manicured as the witty writing of classic Hollywood screenplays, but tinged with a sort of middle-class banality that is nevertheless a pleasure to listen to the actors debit.


No matter how good the script is for dinner that is to say, it’s still hard to imagine the film would do as well if it didn’t have the cast it compiled. A little like american graffiti before (and Dazed and confused after), it’s a film that contains a miraculously talented group of young actors who were all more or less unknown at the time, featuring the likes of mickey rourke, Kevin Bacon, Paul Reiser, Daniel Stern, Tim Dalyand Ellen Barkin. Levinson reportedly forced the actors to spend as much time together as possible before filming, and you can feel that sense of camaraderie between the actors as they must evoke the idea that they grew up together and knew each other their entire lives. So, despite whatever inexperience Levinson may have had as a director at the time, the sharpness of the script combined with the raw talent of the cast makes this the kind of flash-in-a-bottle filmmaking hard to track down.


diner-ellen-barkin
Image Via MGM/United Artists Distribution and Marketing

As likable as the film and its characters are, dinner is a movie that feels a bit odd to be praised now when it’s such a “dude movie,” which makes its subject matter perhaps not seem inherently vital. Plus, there’s dialogue in the film where the characters have, let’s say, less-than-sophisticated ways of talking about women. However, the film would be dishonest if it rewrote history to make these guys more enlightened than one would expect from a typical group of young men in the 1950s, especially when the film is about them having to do this leap from their immature teens. to an adult life full of responsibilities. dinner also feels like a powerful snapshot of its time, as it’s decidedly not a nostalgia piece, often showing that while they’re irreverently having fun, their lives aren’t all fries and gravy, each of them. ‘between them dealing with their own personal issues, including gambling debt, alcoholism, an unexpected pregnancy and marital strife. It’s the way the film navigates the heights of male camaraderie, but also its aftermath that makes dinner also feeling like a precursor to another subgenre, “bromantic comedy”.


When it was released in 1982, dinner did not make a huge dent in the US box office, perhaps due to his studio, MGM, not being very interested in promoting a movie full of unknowns and very little catchy premise. Still, the film was impactful enough to earn Barry Levinson a Best Original Screenplay Oscar nomination while setting him and the film’s stars on the path to becoming mainstays of film and TV. in the 80s and 90s. There also seemed to be something in the air at the time, yearning for the same dialogue-driven stories and minimal plot that would further establish the dating movie. This will show up in other mid-budget movies like Fast times at Ridgemont High (which would be released 6 months later dinner) as well as The big thrill, which will be released a year later. There were also relaxing movies like the ones from 1984 stranger than heaven are making their way into the independent space as well as a Gen-X defining hit in the form of The breakfast club.


dinner-movie-barry-levinson-1
Image Via MGM/United Artists Distribution and Marketing

As the ’80s turned to the ’90s, an even more plotless and comfortably laid-back decade, the haunt movie felt even more appropriate for the times. Some of the decade’s up-and-coming directors first made dating movies on a low budget that would allow them to make studio-backed films in the same vein, like Richard Linklater first production Lazy before Dazed and confused and before sunrise Where Kevin Smith with Clerks before Mallrats and Chasing Amy. Perhaps the most famous instigator of the 90s movie boom was Quentin Tarantinowho recognized the existence of the “haunt film” as a subgenre in the interviews and introduced the phrase into the vernacular of moviegoers in the process. You also had the greatest sitcom of the 90s, Seinfeldturning banter and decidedly low-stakes intrigue into an art form, while its East Coast aesthetic and the fact that much of it takes place in a restaurant can’t help but resemble the Barry Levinson film. .


While the dating movie hasn’t felt as mainstream since the late ’90s, sometimes you’ll get a great one once in a while, like Sean Bakercasual evocations of the fringes of society as Mandarin and The Florida Project or Paul Thomas Anderson’s recent Licorice Pizza. Also, whether any new dating movies come to fruition is kind of irrelevant, because the good thing about any worthwhile dating movie is that it’ll probably hold up even better on subsequent viewings, because you’re probably less focused about the plot than about spending time with the characters in the movie after not seeing them in a while. Much like an old hangout in your hometown, these movies will always be there as a place you can come back to for comfort whenever you want. As Steve Guttenberg’s Eddie puts it when reflecting on the uncertainty of his future, “at least we’ll still have dinner.”


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Ice Cube’s ‘Friday’ Is Like ‘Leave It to Beaver,’ Director F. Gary Gray Says https://mondovino-lefilm.com/ice-cubes-friday-is-like-leave-it-to-beaver-director-f-gary-gray-says/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 06:14:50 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/ice-cubes-friday-is-like-leave-it-to-beaver-director-f-gary-gray-says/ Fans have a lot to love about the 1995 comedy Friday. After all, the film features award-winning performances from Ice Cube and Chris Tucker and marks the directorial debut of F. Gary Gray (Straight outta Compton). But according to Gray himself, there is another reason Friday has become such a cultural phenomenon. And it has […]]]>

Fans have a lot to love about the 1995 comedy Friday. After all, the film features award-winning performances from Ice Cube and Chris Tucker and marks the directorial debut of F. Gary Gray (Straight outta Compton). But according to Gray himself, there is another reason Friday has become such a cultural phenomenon. And it has everything to do with the family sitcom leave it to the beaver. Here’s why the director compares his film to this wholesome TV series.

Chris Tucker and Ice Cube | New line cinema

“Friday” countered early 1990s films like “Boyz n the Hood”

When co-writers Ice Cube and DJ Pooh crafted Friday, they had a very specific goal in mind. In previous years, films made about their hometown, South Central Los Angeles, and others like it focused on violence. Ice Cube himself stars in perhaps the most notable of this series of films, the Oscar-nominated 1991 film Boyz in the hood. Corn Friday takes a very different approach to urban neighborhoods in Southern California.

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Movie review: Gasoline Alley is a lazy, ugly thriller that furthers the sad decline of Bruce Willis’ career https://mondovino-lefilm.com/movie-review-gasoline-alley-is-a-lazy-ugly-thriller-that-furthers-the-sad-decline-of-bruce-willis-career/ Sun, 27 Feb 2022 23:00:39 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/movie-review-gasoline-alley-is-a-lazy-ugly-thriller-that-furthers-the-sad-decline-of-bruce-willis-career/ Another day, another Bruce Willis direct-to-DVD effort that continues the strange and sad decline of his career. In tune with the last dozen or so efforts he’s sleepwalked into (meaning if he decides to show up for filming that day), Willis barely fits into gasoline alleythe fourth collaboration with the director Edward Drake (cosmic sin, […]]]>

Another day, another Bruce Willis direct-to-DVD effort that continues the strange and sad decline of his career. In tune with the last dozen or so efforts he’s sleepwalked into (meaning if he decides to show up for filming that day), Willis barely fits into gasoline alleythe fourth collaboration with the director Edward Drake (cosmic sin, Mountain peak, US Headquarters), a crime thriller that cannot escape the ugliness of its premise.

Really, even allowing it to be called a “mystery” thriller gives the movie too much credence, as Drake doesn’t seem keen on covering up the guilt of its obvious villain, apparently more invested in giving himself a pat on the back for his meta. inclusion of one of his own films (US Headquarters) being used as a plot setting as suspect Jimmy (Devon Sawathe only actor who really cares about the craft) travels through Los Angeles in an effort to clear his name.

Jimmy, you see, has a criminal past, and he gets involved with the nice prostitute Star (Irina Antonenko) just hours before his death means Detectives Freeman (Willis) and Vargas (Luke Wilson, aware of the type of film he’s in, so delivers with flair accordingly) are on his case. The movie would like us to suspect Jimmy, but it frames him so obviously that we know he’s the only character we can trust, and because Sawa delivers the only performance worth investing in, there is interest, however minor, as he goes it alone. investigation.

Over the course of 97 minutes, Jimmy encounters various types of bums (all completely indistinguishable from each other) in his quest to prove his innocence. If Sawa had benefited from a better script and better direction, you can almost imagine a passable film being made in the process. He works so far beyond his requirements that it only heightens Willis’ genuine disinterest and Drake’s utter disregard for continuity; note that if you are going to be filming in Georgia and passing it off as Los Angeles, be sure to remove the visual signs of the city from your final product.

It’s a real shame that whatever Willis gets attached to at this point is almost immediately ignored – unless, of course, you’re watching for the involuntary laughter – and while gasoline alley is not a characteristic of Willis, his presence will drive people away, and rightly so. It’s ultimately a shame for an actor like Sawa, someone who has consistently delivered great performances in many under-seen projects and deserves his own spotlight in something, anything, that treats him with respect which Drake so clearly does not return.

ONE AND A HALF STARS (OUT OF FIVE)

gasoline alley premieres in select theaters, digital and on-demand in the United States from February 25, 2022. It will be available to rent and/or purchase on DVD and Blu-ray in Australia from April 6, 2022.

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NAACP Image Awards to honor artists and writers of color https://mondovino-lefilm.com/naacp-image-awards-to-honor-artists-and-writers-of-color/ Sun, 27 Feb 2022 03:06:02 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/naacp-image-awards-to-honor-artists-and-writers-of-color/ Los Angeles – Samuel L. Jackson as well as Prince Harry and Meghan are some of the people who will be honored at the NAACP Image Awards. Netflix enters with 52 nominations, led by the film “The Harder They Fall,” at the 53rd annual awards show, which will be televised Saturday at 8 p.m. ET […]]]>

Los Angeles – Samuel L. Jackson as well as Prince Harry and Meghan are some of the people who will be honored at the NAACP Image Awards.

Netflix enters with 52 nominations, led by the film “The Harder They Fall,” at the 53rd annual awards show, which will be televised Saturday at 8 p.m. ET on BET. Jackson will receive the President’s Award. Prince Harry and Meghan, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, will receive the President’s Award.

Anthony Anderson returns as host of the awards show, which highlights the works of artists, writers, activists and athletes of color. The ceremony will also include a performance by nine-time Grammy winner Mary J. Blige, who co-headlined the Super Bowl halftime show this month.

Throughout this week, the organization has practically handed out a slew of awards to artists such as Jazmine Sullivan for Outstanding Female Artist, Issa Rae for Outstanding Writing in a Comedy Series, and Will Smith for Outstanding Literary Work.

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15 short films nominated for the Oscars https://mondovino-lefilm.com/15-short-films-nominated-for-the-oscars/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 07:32:05 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/15-short-films-nominated-for-the-oscars/ Many people think of shorts as practice drills or dress rehearsals, something done by an aspiring filmmaker. Obviously, the goal is to make real films, right? These shorts are meant as demo reels, business cards, or experiments – they might be considered juvenile or proof-of-concept models, but not exactly real movies. That’s my bias, at […]]]>

Many people think of shorts as practice drills or dress rehearsals, something done by an aspiring filmmaker. Obviously, the goal is to make real films, right? These shorts are meant as demo reels, business cards, or experiments – they might be considered juvenile or proof-of-concept models, but not exactly real movies.

That’s my bias, at least, although I know some very serious filmmakers who work entirely in the short film genre because that’s how they want to tell their stories. I feel that way even though I know the 90 minute or 2 hour movie convention has more to do with theaters wanting/needing to maximize audience churn than any artistic goal. Some 3-minute films are completely complete. Most movies I see are at least a little too long.

All 15 Oscar-nominated shorts are in theaters today. Three programs – live action, animation and documentary – each over the duration of a conventional film. You can buy one ticket and watch one of the five nominees, or buy three tickets and watch them all. It’s a bargain and a great experience, especially for 2021, which has produced an interesting and somewhat atypical list of Oscar hopefuls.

Usually, documentary shorts are as dark as they are rigorously made – but this year they are generally uplifting. And the Academy has attached a warning label to this year’s animated program – they want you to know this is not a selection of films aimed at children as most have been. years past. Only Aardman Animations’ “Robin Robin” stop-motion story, directed by Dan Ojari & Mikey Please, about a baby bird adopted by a family of mice, is suitable for very young children. (It’s a very sweet film, and probably the favorite to win, given that it features the voice talents of well-known actors, including Gillian Anderson and Richard E. Grant.)

On the other hand, the 15-minute Chilean stop-motion film “Beast” aka “Bestia”, by Hugo Covarrubias, explores the conflicted life of Ingrid Olderock, a particularly vicious secret policewoman working under the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet. .

Olderock, the daughter of German Nazi sympathizers who fled to Chile after the war, spent her life psychologically terrorizing female prisoners, training dogs to sexually assault them. Covarrubias said that while Olderock was a historical person, his film “is psychological fiction, where we go into his mind and try to show how all these mental disorders end up representing an entire country. The trauma of a country [is seen] through the evil that this woman represents.”

Just so you know, it’s not “Bambi”. (Which is actually a very dark story – the original novel being even darker than the Disney cartoon.)

And Spanish animator Alberto Mielgo’s “The Windshield Wiper,” also around 15 minutes long, is a moving and surprising work about the nature of love that features male and female nudity, sex, and adult themes. (And is one of my favorites from this year’s crop of nominees.)

Hand-drawn “Boxballet” by Russian director Anton Dyakov, is an eerily funny riff on “Beauty and the Beast” that depicts the romance between a naïve, tricky dancer and a rough boxer. “Affairs of the Art” is a British-Canadian production, a sort of sequel to the 1987 animated short “Girls Night Out”, https://www.arkansasonline.com/news/2022/feb/25/15 – Oscar-nominated shorts/”Body Beautiful” (1990) and “Dreams & Desires: Family Ties” (2006), all of which feature the working-class character Beryl and her family. In this episode, middle-aged Beryl decides to be an artist and takes up drawing to hilarious effect. It contains nudity and a wonderfully wicked taxidermy scene.

The live-action program features the dystopian black comedy “Please Hold,” from Los Angeles-based filmmakers KD Davila and Omer Levin Menekse, about a young Hispanic man mistakenly arrested by a police drone and held in a fully automated prison without any means of appeal; actor-rapper Riz Ahmed in Aneil Karia’s “The Long Goodbye,” a film made to accompany Ahmed’s concept album inspired, in part, by the rise of far-right political groups and anti- immigration in post-Brexit Britain; “Ala Kachuu (Take and Run)”, a 38-minute Swiss short film directed in 2020 by Maria Brendle, about an ambitious Kyrgyz woman who is kidnapped and forced to marry a stranger; “The Dress” (aka “Sukienka”) by Polish director Tadeusz Lysiak, about a disabled maid working in a run-down motel who craves love and intimacy; and “On My Mind,” a Danish film about love, loss, longing and the healing power of karaoke by Martin Strange-Hansen.

Netflix nabbed three films in the short documentary category: “Audible” by Matthew Ogens and Geoff McLean, which follows a deaf high school football player and his classmates through their senior year; “Lead Me Home” by Pedro Kos and Jon Shenk, a poignant and majestic film that highlights the vastness of homelessness on the West Coast; and Afghan filmmakers Gulistan and Elizabeth Mirzaei’s “Three Songs for Benazir,” which follows a young, newly married Afghan refugee living in a Kabul displaced persons camp. Rounding out the program are Ben Proudfoot’s “The Queen of Basketball” about Lusia Harris, who scored the first basket in women’s Olympic basketball and was drafted into the NBA; and Jay Rosenblatt’s “When We Were Bullies,” which chronicles the filmmaker’s efforts to reunite with his fifth-grade class and teacher to re-examine a 50-year-old bullying incident.

E-mail:

pmartin@adgnewsroom.com

Over the past 35 years, Joanna Quinn and Les Mills have made four animated shorts about their fictional character Beryl, a daring working-class Welsh housewife with artistic ambitions. Their latest, “Affairs of the Art”, is nominated for an Academy Award.
Photo The Oscar-nominated short documentary ‘Three Songs for Benazir’ follows Shaista, a refugee married to Benazir and living in a camp for displaced people, as he tries to become the first member of his tribe to join the Afghan National Army. .
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Olivia Rodrigo’s Movie Trailer Reveals Disney+ Filming Documentary https://mondovino-lefilm.com/olivia-rodrigos-movie-trailer-reveals-disney-filming-documentary/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 19:28:00 +0000 https://mondovino-lefilm.com/olivia-rodrigos-movie-trailer-reveals-disney-filming-documentary/ Disney+ unveils a trailer for Olivia Rodrigo’s upcoming documentary, following the creative and personal journey behind her hit album SOUR. Grammy-nominated Olivia Rodrigo will release a documentary, OLIVIA RODRIGO: Drive Home 2 u (A SOUR Movie) exclusively on Disney+. After releasing his debut single “Drivers License” in 2021, Rodrigo captured media attention and broke records […]]]>

Disney+ unveils a trailer for Olivia Rodrigo’s upcoming documentary, following the creative and personal journey behind her hit album SOUR.

Grammy-nominated Olivia Rodrigo will release a documentary, OLIVIA RODRIGO: Drive Home 2 u (A SOUR Movie) exclusively on Disney+. After releasing his debut single “Drivers License” in 2021, Rodrigo captured media attention and broke records to become one of the best-selling songs of the year. In addition to earning seven Grammy nominations and breaking chart records, Rodrigo won New Artist of the Year at the American Music Awards and received Best International Song at this year’s BRIT Awards. year for his song “Good 4 U”.

Following the release of his album SOUR, Rodrigo was named Artist of the Year 2021 by Time Magazine. Since then, Rodrigo has received consistent praise from the entertainment industry and accumulated fans around the world, with Captain Marvel star Brie Larson covering Rodrigo’s song “Jealousy, Jealousy” and Mandy Moore fan-casting Rodrigo for a An unforgettable walk to restart. Currently, she is touring the United States and Europe to promote her debut album.

VIDEO OF THE DAY

Related: Olivia Rodrigo’s Good 4 U Music Video: Every Movie Reference & Tribute

Now, Disney+ unveils the trailer for OLIVIA RODRIGO: drive home 2 uwhich follows Rodrigo’s road trip from Salt Lake City to Los Angeles while making SOUR. Directed by Stacey Lee and produced by Interscope Films and Supper Club, the intimate documentary will follow her personal journey through behind-the-scenes and unshared footage of her creative process. The documentary will also feature new live arrangements and performances of his songs from the studio album. Check out the trailer below:


Click here to see the trailer

Although this is Rodrigo’s first feature-length documentary, she is no stranger to the streaming platform, as she stars in the musical high school to restart, High School Musical: The Musical: The Series as Nina “Nini” Salazar-Roberts. Contrary to initial speculation about Rodrigo’s exit from the show, it was ordered for a Season 3 renewal and began filming in January with the popstar in attendance. This latest documentary about the singer follows the original 2021 Disney+ concert film Happier Than Ever: A Love Letter to Los AngelesGrammy-winning artist Billie Eilish’s tribute concert in her hometown.


From starring in a Disney show to having his own feature documentary, Rodrigo has come so far in his young career. The highly anticipated film is now leaving many fans eager for its arrival on the streaming platform, giving them the chance to explore the in-depth creative processes behind its album and hear new arrangements of its songs. OLIVIA RODRIGO: Drive Home 2 u (A SOUR Movie) is set to premiere March 25, exclusively on Disney+.

More: Disney+’s High School Musical Show Is Better Without The Movie Connections

Source: Disney+

Loki Season 2’s Renslayer Tease Backs A Big Kang The Conqueror Theory


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